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Flatrock Passive: A Garden and a Sun Shade

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is one of a series of blogs by David Goodyear describing the construction of his new home in Flatrock, Newfoundland, the first in the province built to the Passive House standard. The first installment of the GBA blog series was titled An Introduction to the Flatrock Passive House. His most recent post was Taking a Tour. You’ll find his complete blog here.   This year, summer got off to a bad start. June was cold, with an average temperature of around 7°C (44.6°F), accompanied by a lot of cloud cover and drizzle. I have realized over the past 10 years that outdoor living in Newfoundland is really limited. Summer is short and you really don’t have a whole lot of time to enjoy it.RELATED ARTICLESA Quantitative Look at Solar Heat GainWindow Shades, Blinds, and AwningsDo Window Shades Save Energy?Green Landscapes: Native Plants and SoilResilient Food Supply Systems For this reason, I planned on using the outdoor space quite differently than at my previous property. I also wanted to make sure that my time in the garden had some payback. I decided that a good place to invest my time and effort would be a landscape that offers some food security. As well, I wanted a low-maintenance landscape that grows well in our environment, and is resilient to drought and pests. My plan for landscaping was quite simple really: Go back 50 years and do what most Newfoundland families did. They grew root vegetables. Good cold-climate varieties that are tuned to our short growing season are easily accessible, and they can be stored for long periods of time under the right conditions. With the right plantings, you can get multiple crops out of the same plants. With this in mind, we decided to grow onions (160 plants), turnips (120), carrots (300), beets (100), cabbage (20), parsnips (100), and lettuce (who knows!). We also planted some herbs that lend themselves well to drying for winter use. Potatoes are a staple here, and luckily they are dead easy to grow. Our vegetable garden takes up the whole back yard! Winter storage With all the vegetables and about 180 potato plants, creating long-term storage was a necessity. I designed and built an underground cellar which sits in a slope on the east side yard. It is basically a concrete bunker with a structural slab sitting on the top. The whole thing was tarred on the outside and a pond liner was draped over the top to help shed water. I installed some leftover 4-inch EPS foam insulation on the top of the slab because I wasn’t sure I would be able to backfill the cellar with enough soil to ward off frigid winter temperatures and the heat of summer. The thermal properties of various soil types is pretty complicated. This being said, there appears to be a consensus that the R-value varies between 0.1 to 0.25 per inch. Adding 4 inches of foam is equivalent to adding many feet of earth. It doesn’t add thermal mass, but it is much easier on your back than shoveling a couple of  loads of topsoil! We added about 2 feet of earth on top of the cellar and I plan on seeding it with grass sometime soon. I still have to build some shelving but there should be no problems having this ready for winter. An underground root cellar is protected by earth and 4-inch-thick EPS insulation. During April and May, I finished several larger projects: I added a small deck for the back entrance and a veranda under the front overhang. The driveway is now paved and the front yard is now being landscaped. I am hoping to seed this week with timothy grass, white clover, and red clover. Things are shaping up nicely. Summer comfort and energy use As for energy use, our usage for the month of June 11- July 11 was 651 kWh. Given that the average June temperature was 7°C, I felt that this was fairly respectable. The heating system ran about two days altogether. With the heating season over, I can safely assume that this is approximately the baseload of the building. I have installed a Nyle Geyser air-to-water heat pump that helps with some cooling and dehumidification while maintaining the temperature of the Logix24 boiler tank for hot water use. The unit pulls warm air from the living room, into the heat pump, and pushes cool air upstairs. The cold coils capture some latent heat and the condensed moisture is drained into a floor drain. In short, the Gyle captures heat from the air in the house and cools it in order to heat the hot water for the tank. Overall, the house temperature has been fairly constant. There have been a few days when the outside humidity has been so high that it led to increased humidity inside the house. I had the ERV set on continuous ventilation and didn’t realize it. This was a huge mistake. This made the building very stuffy because of all the humidity, although the interior temperature has been fairly constant. At one point, the temperature inside the house was about 23.5°C (74.3°F), which is well under what Passive House considers an overheating event …. however, the humidity has varied quite a bit. Humidity as high as 80% has led to apparent temperatures of about 29°C (84.2°F) or higher! Humidity plays a huge role in comfort. So I have been playing with nighttime flushing by opening windows during the night and closing them in the morning. That has been somewhat effective. Even though I don’t mind opening and closing windows, I can see how it wouldn’t be convenient for most people. There was a bit of a learning curve to determine how much to open our windows. Our location is so windy that the wind can blow the screens out of the windows! It would be nice if the night purge was more automated. I find myself looking more at the weather forecast so I can time opening the windows with cool temperatures and low humidity, only to wake up and find it has rained and the air coming in the house is at 95%+ humidity. The smart mode on the ERV tries to save energy by limiting ventilation when the temperature outside gets too hot. During this time it recirculates air throughout the house. I have found that having the recirculate mode set to 100% of the motor capacity helps with moving some cool air around. Some HRVs have the ability to bypass the core to cool the home when exterior air is cooler. My ERV does not. This is one feature that I wish our unit had. However, ventilation CFMs are usually not high enough to cover the cooling loads required, so the extra money spent on the fancy ERV with bypass may not have worked out anyways. For now. I’ll stick to opening the windows! Building a window shade Earlier in the summer, my first project was adding a shade structure to several windows on the main level. The WUFI model showed some overheating in the middle of summer without the structure in place. Before we installed the clapboard siding, I had attached vertical ledgers (I call it a vertical ledger board) so I could secure braces that would be used to attach the shade structure (see the first image in the gallery). My design uses a set of 90° brackets secured to the vertical ledgers. Rather than 2×6 slats specified in the original drawings, I decided to use 2x3s. The shading provided when the sun sits lower in the sky would be different, but with some investigation on paper, I determined that one could space the 2×3 closer together in order to get a similar effective shading. I built the brackets in my workshop and stained them white to match the trim on the house. I lifted the brackets in place from a ladder and secured them to the house. I leveled the two at the ends and attached a string line between them. The two in the middle were lifted up in place until they just touched the line and then they were secured. Each bracket is secured with a six 8″ x 3/8″ lag screws. Once the brackets were installed, I measured and cut all the components,  i.e. 2×6 joists and 2×3 slats. I stained all the parts in my workshop. The structure went up once piece at a time. The main joists were lifted in place from a ladder. They were then secured with #10 5-inch plated screws. Laying out the slats was first done on paper. As I added slats, I checked the remaining distance and made small adjustments to spacing so there would be slats at either end (see Images #2 and #3 in the gallery). The shade structure definitely makes a difference to the solar irradiance inside the house. I estimate that the shadow it casts is at least 40% of the total illuminated area. I have noticed as we moved into June that the main level doesn’t heat up as quickly as it did a month before. June has been cold so the solar gains would have been nice, but the model uses average climatic data, so performance is based on an average rather than a specific weather pattern for the given year. The most difficult part of the installation was moving the heavy ladder around. The job was fairly time-consuming, mainly because of the number of times I had to climb up and down the ladder. That being said, the exercise really warmed me up on those cold days of May.last_img read more

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ROUND 10: Broner tries to establish offense, Pacquiao eggs him on

first_imgGrace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations LATEST STORIES Adrien Broner, left, hits Manny Pacquiao during the WBA welterweight title boxing match Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)MANILA, Philippines—Adrien Broner shortens his stance at the start of the 10th round but he’s still relying on that jab while Manny Pacquiao still looking for that opportunity to land his flurries.Pacquiao then eggs Broner to fight.ADVERTISEMENT ROUND 9: Manny Pacquiao rocks Adrien Broner with killer left ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants MOST READ SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte The champion then lands a stiff body shot and dodges Broner’s counter.Broner, though, quickly lands a stiff right to the face of Pacquiao but the Filipino just shrugs it off.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

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Trans Tasman Tour Diary – Scott Buckley

first_imgAustralian Men’s Open player, Scott Buckley tells www.austouch.com.au about his day on tour on Thursday, which involved kids clinics, training, some Frisbee Golf  and the Australian Jersey Presentation on the eve of the 2014 Trans Tasman Series which starts today in Mudgee. The day started off as usual being woken up earlier than expected by my human alarm clock or roommate Tim Good (when he’s up everyone’s up apparently). We were off to get some breakfast then time to get ready for some local coaching clinics. The bus trip started off with the usual pre-bus Instagram photo and we split ourselves into five groups, the teachers (Steve, Robbie, Pete, myself) and Topey, the king of clinics, took the lead of each group and had two teammates with each of us. As we got there each leader was given a drill that we were to do with each group. These drills allowed us to engage with each group to get to know them and vice versa. The groups were made of boys and girls between the ages of eight and 16 as well as a special needs group. Throughout the course of the clinics I don’t know who had more fun, the kids or us. It’s very pleasing to see the positive affect that each person has with the kids participating and then the effect that they return have on us. Once each group rotated through it was then time for some autographs to be signed, with the usual Goody stitch up, every kid was informed of the typo that Steve Roberts caps and age had been mixed up. This was then complete and we were back off to get some lunch and then the much anticipated second leg of Frisbee Golf during our down time.After yesterday’s victory to Prowse and Ranga many of the boys were after some revenge. Prowse had a new partner in Tim Good, Ranga decided to skip the event to chill with a few of the other boys. Once again after nine holes and Prowse’s unorthodox but very effective technique he and Tim cleaned up and took it out with the three remaining teams being on even score. We were then off to training to fine tune a few things before tomorrow’s test match. It was just a light hour session however the feel and vibe around the whole group was very positive and upbeat. Our team is still hurting from last year’s Trans Tasman loss and is eager to put that trophy back in our cabinet and it was evident in the way that we trained. Soon after our return from the package we were in the showers and preparing for the jersey presentation dinner.Just before our Presentation dinner Trady asked that all the boys meet in Wayne Grant’s room. Steve gave us a story of sacrifice from a Victorian Cross recipient and this was followed by a video Trady had put together of our short history from 2010 – 2014.  It had ups, downs, glory, defeat and many fond memories of previous tours to remember the journey of our team. From here we made our way to dinner.This is the first time that TFA had incorporated the jersey dinner with family and friends and it was good to see so many of these out in force to support the Australian contingent. Dinner was served, followed by the Mixed receiving their jerseys, then the Women’s and finally the Men’s. No matter if it’s your first test, your 10th of 30th it’s a very special moment to be presented with your Australian Jersey. Once all teams had received their jerseys it was time for the Flag Bearers to be announced. Kristin Boss from the Women’s, Matt Tope from the Men’s and Steve Cunningham from the support staff were all given the honour to carry the flag; all of whom are very deserving recipients of this. It was a busy day but what was taken from this day is something I will never forget, the smiles on the kid’s faces, as well as that of your team mates, the honour of receiving your jersey and what it means to represent your country. The day is done and after a goodnight sleep we’re less than 12 hours away from kick off, I can’t wait!!Keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2014 Trans Tasman Series: Website – www.touchfootball.com.au Facebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia Twitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (#transtasman2014) Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustralia YouTube – www.youtube.com/touchfootballaus Related LinksTrans Tasman Diarylast_img read more

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Videos: Ole Miss Guard Stefan Moody Keeps Hitting Threes From The Midcourt Logo

first_imgStefan Moody hits a deep three.Vine/Ryan FaganLSU superstar Ben Simmons picked the wrong night to go silent, because his counterpart—Ole Miss guard Stefan Moody—is doing his best Steph Curry impression. Moody has 21 points so far tonight, with six coming on a pair of absurdly deep threes. LSU has a giant midcourt logo, but no one should be hitting these shots in a game.Stefan Moody shot from the ‘U’ at midcourt with 26 seconds left on the shot clock. And he buried it https://t.co/BV7VVkODz9— Rob Dauster (@RobDauster) January 14, 2016The next #Steph is … #Stef? This is so deep https://t.co/QJb3Vp6Y4A (Vine via @ryanfagan)— Rob Dauster (@RobDauster) January 14, 2016As if those two shots weren’t backbreaking enough, he also had a highlight reel-worthy putback slam.Stefan Moody just out here makin plays https://t.co/Rtpe4EHPqk #SCtop10— Maria Martin (@Ria_Martin) January 14, 2016Moody’s in the zone tonight, and his Rebs lead LSU, a 10 point favorite, 58-54 midway through the second half.last_img read more

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Reports: Charleston Transfer Canyon Barry Down To 7 Finalists

first_imgCanyon Barry shoots a shot.Canyon BarryCharleston graduate transfer guard Canyon Barry has cut his list to seven finalists, according to multiple reports. Charleston transfer Canyon Barry’s finalists: Cal, Florida, Kansas, Louisville, Miami, Northwestern, Ole miss.— Jeff Goodman (@GoodmanESPN) April 4, 2016Charleston transfer Canyon Barry told @CBSSports he has cut his list to Cal, Florida, Kansas, Louisville, Miami, Northwestern, and Ole Miss.— Jon Rothstein (@JonRothstein) April 4, 2016The 6-foot-6 Barry is the son of NBA Hall of Famer Rick Barry. He was averaging 19.7 points per game this season before a shoulder injury ended his season in early January. Barry has also made headlines for copying his father’s famous underhanded free throw style.last_img read more

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G7 leaders cant avoid Iran at summit with Trump say European diplomats

first_imgOTTAWA – Donald Trump’s decision Tuesday to withdraw the United States from the Iran nuclear agreement will be a topic of discussion at next month’s G7 summit in Quebec’s Charlevoix region, European diplomats say.It will join trade issues among the more potentially charged topics that could highlight divisions between the mercurial U.S. president and his G7 counterparts — an unenviable position for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when he hosts them for two days of talks.The European ambassadors, who were taking part in a panel discussion on the upcoming summit, played down the potential for divisions with the U.S. — including the potential for a new G6 configuration that would exclude America — saying the small exclusive club of the world’s richest countries could handle a round of frank discussion.Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland expressed Canada’s regret over the U.S. decision to withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, which she called “essential” to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons capability and ensuring global security.“Iran must not be allowed to develop nuclear weapons,” Freeland said in a written statement. “The JCPOA has subjected Iran’s nuclear program to a rigorous and unprecedented international verification regime by the International Atomic Energy Agency.”She acknowledged that the deal, agreed to by Iran in 2015 and endorsed by the United Nations, “is not perfect. It has, however, helped to curb a real threat to international peace and security.”Freeland noted that just two weeks ago, G7 foreign ministers unanimously committed to “permanently ensuring that Iran’s nuclear program remains exclusively peaceful, in line with its non-proliferation treaty obligations and its commitments under the (JCPOA).”“Canada regrets that the United States has decided to withdraw from the JCPOA, particularly given that, according to the IAEA, Iran continues to implement its JCPOA commitments,” she said.Many of Canada’s western allies similarly expressed their disappointment at Trump’s decision, which served as a harbinger of how fast-moving global events can upset the carefully scripted G7 agenda that Trudeau will be trying to advance.“It is evident that actually this will be one of the topics to be discussed at the summit,” Peteris Ustubs, the European Union ambassador to Canada, said of Trump’s decision.But Ustubs dismissed any suggestion that the U.S. position had potential to “diminish and change the formulation” of the club to a G6.“We should avoid thinking that (the) G7 is only the club of the convenient conversations,” said Ustubs. “If there are conversations which are inconvenient that’s the part of the G7 conversations.”The European Union is a full-fledged member of the G7, but it does not have so-called numbered status.Germany’s ambassador to Canada, Sabine Sparwasser, said the G7 has always been a forum where there is room for disagreement and discussion.But she said it is no secret that the U.S. decision on Iran is “a blow” to what was an important diplomatic victory. “We thought the deal as such made the world a little bit safer for the time being,” she said.Sparwasser said it was too early to comment on all the implications of Trump’s decision, but “we will try to salvage what we can.”French ambassador Kareen Rispal, whose country takes over the G7 presidency from Canada next year, said the group would overcome its obstacles.“We can’t exclude any state or any country that has a difference of view,” she said. “Yes, it’s a risk to have a communique with 6 plus 1, but I think everybody is trying to avoid this kind of situation because we would go nowhere.”Earlier Tuesday at the same symposium, Trudeau’s chief G7 organizer said that the world leaders simply cannot avoid a discussion of thorny trade issues.Peter Boehm, the Canadian sherpa, didn’t mention Trump by name, but he too was addressing the same day-long conference focused on how to shape Canadian foreign policy in the age of the disruptive, protectionist influence of the current U.S. president.“I’m afraid we can’t avoid a trade discussion in Charlevoix,” Boehm told the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.“We’re aware that this is a challenging issue within the G7, particularly with the backdrop of steel and aluminum tariffs and NAFTA negotiations.”Despite the challenges, Boehm said the G7 leaders may be able to reach an agreement on the need for a revitalized World Trade Organization.“Canada and its G7 partners need to remain committed to working together on strengthening the rules-based trading system, fighting protectionism and encouraging free trade so that all citizens can take advantage,” said Boehm.The day-long gathering of foreign policy experts, diplomats and academics took place under the banner, “Positioning Canada in the Shifting International Order.”That shift referred mainly to Trump and the wrecking ball that many say he has taken to the world’s multilateral institutions.Rona Ambrose, the former Conservative cabinet minister who is an adviser on the government’s non-partisan NAFTA panel, told the gathering that Canadians can no longer adhere to the “romantic notion” that Canada and the U.S. remain best friends and allies.That said, a deal on NAFTA that all three countries could live with is still possible, she insisted, crediting the Liberal government with doing everything it can do get a deal with the unpredictable Trump administration.Peter Donolo,who was communications chief to former Liberal prime minister Jean Chretien, said Trump won’t be satisfied with any NAFTA outcome that does not allow him to declare all-out victory.“He will define a success as, ‘We’ve won, we’ve won big time; Canada and Mexico are eating dust; they’re eating dirt, they’re done; they’re humiliated.’”last_img read more

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BC chief says they didnt give up rights for pipeline to be

first_imgChiefs and elected council members from several B.C. First Nations including the Haida, Gitxsan and Babine Lake, stepped up to share their support and stories of resistance against industry.Wayne Christian of the Secwepemc nation told the crowd that “legislative genocide” had been waged against Indigenous peoples for generations.Harvey Humchitt, a hereditary chief with the Heiltsuk First Nation in Bella Bella, where a barge ran aground spilling oil into the waters, said it only takes one incident to cause devastation. SMITHERS, B.C. – A Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief told a crowd of First Nation leaders gathered in Smithers, B.C., that no elected band council or Crown authority has jurisdiction over the land.Chief Na’Moks says the rights of the hereditary chiefs to the land have never been extinguished.He says the agreements signed by pipeline builder Coastal GasLink are illegitimate and the support shown by those gathered, and by many people around the world, proves the Wet’suwet’en hereditary leaders do not stand alone.last_img read more

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What to Expect From Michael Phelps If He Swims in Rio de

None of this isn’t to say that Phelps can’t surprise his doubters in 2016. But the age and steady progress of other swimmers will be working against him should he compete in Rio. Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in history, announced this week that he was returning to competitive swimming. Phelps had retired following a six-medal performance at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Phelps and his coach, Bob Bowman, aren’t saying whether he’s gearing up for another run at the Olympics, but it’s hard not to speculate about one of the best athletes ever returning to competition. (Remember the hype surrounding a 38-year-old Michael Jordan’s return to basketball?)I’m not here to speculate about whether Phelps will make it to Rio de Janeiro in 2016. But if he represents the United States for a fifth time — he would be 31 — how might he perform?Putting aside conditioning concerns — Phelps only swam occasionally in the year following his retirement, though he is reportedly now working out with Bowman five days a week — the specter of age looms large. Thirty-one is ancient for an Olympic swimmer. Since 1968, only 17 athletes 31 and older have participated in any of the individual events Phelps would probably attempt (100- and 200-meter butterfly; 200-meter freestyle; and 200- and 400-meter individual medley). The average age of medalists in those events was 21.4.Of course, Phelps isn’t the typical Olympic swimmer. At his peak, the 2008 Games, he set the world record in four of the five individual events (he had to settle for just an Olympic record in the 100-meter butterfly; he broke the world record in that event in 2009). So, in 2016, Phelps might be a shadow of his former self, but even a diminished version of history’s best swimmer could be a force to be reckoned with.In the 2012 Olympics, Phelps took individual gold medals in the 100-meter butterfly and the 200-meter medley, and also grabbed silver in the 200-meter butterfly. If we look at how swimmers in those events tend to age, perhaps we can get an idea of whether Phelps is likely to be competitive if he takes to the water in 2016. Unfortunately, the data is sparse on competitors in their 30s, but here’s how the average male swimmer who participated in back-to-back Games tends to see his times change from one Olympics to the next (since 1968, with a minimum sample of four swimmers in each age group): In each graph, the trend is unsurprising: Swimmers get progressively worse with age. If Phelps follows the same paths, he could expect to post average times of 52.2 seconds in the 100-meter butterfly (which wouldn’t have gotten him out of the semifinals in London), 1:57.4 in the 200-meter butterfly (which would have missed qualifying out of Round 1 in 2012), and 1:58.1 in the 200-meter individual medley (which would have qualified for the final, but not earned a medal, in London). Obviously, there’s plenty of uncertainty around those extrapolations, but they give us a sense of how age may affect Phelps — even if he’s prepared and in shape for Rio.There’s one other factor working against Phelps: The rest of the field is getting faster. The average time for a finalist and a gold medalist has steadily decreased in each of Phelps’s best events since 1968: read more

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Football The cost of recruiting in the Big Ten Conference

OSU recruits Trevon Grimes and Tyjon Lindsey visited Columbus for the OSU vs. Nebraska football game on Nov. 5. Lindsey has since decommitted. Credit: Giustino BovenziOn Nov. 5, the Ohio State Buckeyes were getting ready to take on the Nebraska Cornhuskers for an 8 p.m. showdown in Columbus. Not only were these two teams slugging it out to continue the quest for a national championship, but this game served as a massive recruiting battle for the Buckeyes. More than 20 four- and five-star high-school recruits paid visits, both official and unofficial, to Ohio Stadium to decide whether to commit to the Buckeyes.After the Buckeyes destroyed the Cornhuskers 62-3, recruits met with Urban Meyer and took pictures with their potential jersey numbers to cap off OSU’s full-on press to sway some of the nation’s top talent.Meyer often refers to recruiting as the “lifeblood of the program.” But how much money is spent to acquire that lifeblood?In a months-long project, The Lantern analyzed how much money was spent on recruiting by OSU and the rest of the Big Ten Conference.As the Big Ten team with the most wins and only football national championship in the past four years, the numbers show the Buckeyes spend, on average, on pace in comparison to the other schools in the Big Ten.Records show OSU spent just over $2 million on recruiting from 2012 to 2015. Though that might seem like a lot, other schools spent more.The Big Ten’s biggest spender, Nebraska, spent $3.46 million to expand its recruiting reach.The lowest-spending team, the Wisconsin Badgers, spent just $1.02 million.When you break down OSU’s $2.009 million, it averages out to $502,439 per year from 2012 to 2015. Divide spending by wins, and OSU spent $40,423 per win, giving them the second-lowest cost per win (CPW) rate in the conference.Bubba Bolden (left) and Tate Martell (right) visit Columbus for the OSU vs. Nebraska game on Nov. 5. Bolden has since committed to USC. Credit: Giustino Bovenzi“I don’t know what other people spend money on, but we’re really financially conscious just because one: There’s no need to be frivolous with money, and two: That’s something you want to do for your administration, for your athletic director,” OSU wide receivers coach Zach Smith said. “We don’t take first- class flights, we don’t stay in $400-a-night hotels, and I don’t know if that’s what they spend money on, but we’re real conscious because there’s no need for that. We’re just trying to do a job, and we have whatever we need to do that job.After analyzing yearly NCAA membership financial reports from fiscal 2012 to 2015, and conducting interviews with Big Ten officials, The Lantern also found that recruitment spending in the Big Ten rises each year.The findings were calculated from NCAA financial membership reports that detail each school’s complete financial budget for fiscal years 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Some universities, like Penn State, post financial records online.Thirteen of the 14 members of the Big Ten provided data, while Northwestern University, a private institution, declined to participate. The university is not subject to open-records laws that apply to public schools. Since 2012, recruiting spending across the Big Ten increased 39 percent. That spending commitment by conference teams has amounted to more wins for some schools in the past four seasons. One might think spending money on recruiting is an easy way for a football program to improve its record. But, as the data shows, spending on recruiting doesn’t always result in wins.After coach Urban Meyer took over in Columbus at the end of 2011, the Buckeyes spent $344,987 in 2012. That number grew to $614,619 in three years, showing a 78 percent increase. This is the third-highest rise in the conference during that time, behind only Penn State and Rutgers.OSU officials turned down a request to speak with Meyer about the commitment to recruiting, saying that he would be unavailable to speak to such topics during football season.OSU Vice President and Athletic Director Gene Smith backed the Buckeyes’ spending increases, explaining why there has been a drastic change over the past four years.“We always invest in what is necessary to be successful and recruiting is a part of that,” Gene Smith said in an email. He added that rising travel costs and “hosting expenses” explain the conference’s 39 percent rise in spending.The NCAA does not impose financial limits on how much a university can spend on recruiting. However, spending is limited to the following expenses: travel and lodging for coaches, travel and lodging (coach class airfare and a standard hotel room) for prospects and their parents on official visits, reasonable entertainment expenses (including three tickets to a home sporting event) and up to three meals per day for the prospect and his parents for football recruits.Additionally, there are strict restrictions on the timeframe when a recruit can be contacted by coaches. A full breakdown of recruiting rules and a yearly recruiting calendar can be found on the NCAA website.Smith said these comparisons are like comparing apples to oranges, because, geographically speaking, it’s easier for OSU and more centrally located schools to recruit nationally than it is for a school in the more rural parts of the country.“What it costs OSU to recruit in our geography compared to what it costs Nebraska from Lincoln (Nebraska) or Penn State from Happy Valley (Pennsylvania) is totally different,” Smith said. “Planes, gas, meals per diet regulations, etc., are all different.”Smith’s explanation provided reasoning why the Cornhuskers, the conference’s highest spending team, spent nearly $3.5 million on recruiting.Since Lincoln, Nebraska, is the westernmost school in the conference, it costs more to bring in recruits for official visits and fly out to evaluate potential players. John Jentz, executive associate athletic director and CFO at Nebraska, confirmed travel as the main driver for higher costs.“We have made a conscious investment in expanding our reach to find the best matches for our program,” Jentz said. “(In Nebraska) we like to say, ‘We are in the middle of everywhere,’ but few of those everywheres are reachable by car.”Nebraska’s 34 wins in the Big Ten since 2012 makes it fourth-best in the conference, but its $886,819 spending average makes for a $107,998 CPW average, which is the fourth-highest in this study. Despite the high numbers, Jentz maintained Nebraska’s dedication to improve the football program.“There is a recruiting budget established for each sport, each year,” Jentz said. “But if circumstances dictate more resources are needed for recruiting, we encourage identifying savings elsewhere to ensure success in recruiting.”The Cornhuskers are narrowly followed by the Penn State Nittany Lions, who spent a total of $3.441 million on recruiting over the four-year period. In fact, Penn State spent $1.391 million on recruiting in 2014 alone, the highest of any school in the Big Ten from 2012 to 2015.OSU coach Urban Meyer addresses the crowd at a Skull Session prior to OSU’s game against Nebraska on Nov. 5. Credit: Giustino BonvenziPenn State’s increased spending is explained by other circumstances. Specifically, 2012 was the first year of NCAA-imposed sanctions from the child sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.The number of scholarships dropped from 85 to 65 before the sanctions were gradually, and eventually, lifted. Despite the fact that traveling in general was reduced by the scholarship restrictions, selling a rebounding program to potential recruits is not an easy task.The team that spent the most on recruiting per win was the Purdue Boilermakers. With only 12 wins during four years, their relatively frugal spending on recruiting flips into a $238,795 CPW. These numbers also show how each team has a different philosophy when it comes to recruiting. For instance, Wisconsin tallied the second-most wins with 38 in the Big Ten through the 2012-2015 seasons. The Badgers spent $256,080 on average for recruiting, making its $26,940 CPW the lowest in the Big Ten. Wisconsin Athletics Director Barry Alvarez was unavailable for comment.Since accepting the job as the Buckeyes head coach, Urban Meyer has amassed 50 wins in his first four seasons. The Big Ten historically has been a conference that sticks to recruiting the Midwest. Meyer expanded the program’s reach across the country.OSU redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett, a Wichita Falls, Texas, native, hoped to be recruited by the University of Texas, but never got the call from former coach Mack Brown and the Longhorns. Barrett was then lured to Columbus by then-OSU offensive coordinator, now Longhorns coach, Tom Herman.Meyer openly speaks of how Barrett’s recruitment was unorthodox, admitting that Barrett was the first quarterback prospect he’s ever offered a scholarship without seeing him throw. Statistically speaking, Barrett is among one of the greatest quarterbacks in Buckeye history.A RECRUITING STIGMARecruiting spending is a not topic athletic departments usually discuss with media outlets, partly because a recruiting violation could be uncovered. Think of Reggie Bush accepting benefits at USC, or “Tattoo-Gate” at OSU. In Bush’s case, the violations caused severe penalties for the Trojans, who then had to vacate numerous wins, including their 2004 National Championship and Bush’s Heisman Trophy.A more recent example comes from just last year before the 2016 NFL draft. Top prospect Laremy Tunsil of Ole Miss was outed by his stepfather, who released a bong mask video via Instagram. The hacked account also leaked screenshots of text conversations with a coach that detailed pay for Tunsil’s rent and his mother’s utilities. Tunsil later admitted to accepting illegal benefits during his playing days after he was drafted No. 13 overall by the Miami Dolphins.Most of the data the 13 participating schools provided was fiscal year figures that are reported as a lump sum of recruiting spending.Ohio State provided an additional report with more in-depth explanation of its recruiting spending, including a ledger of coaches’ traveling expenses.The detailed data showed expenditures from Meyer and nearly all of his assistants. The data was clean as far as showing any wrongdoings by the program, but maintaining this detailed data set does have its complications.OSU Athletics Chief Financial Officer Joe Odoguardi said OSU is working to create a newer and better system.“Right now we’re in the process of getting a new travel system that would allow us to (analyze) something like this better electronically, but unfortunately it’s being developed in-house and it’s been delayed for numerous reasons that are too long to explain,” Odoguardi said. “Once something like that is developed, something like this will be a lot easier to produce.” read more

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Logan Stieber sets sights on 2016 Olympics

OSU’s Logan Stieber (right) wrestles with North Carolina State’s Kevin Jack in a 141-pound semifinal during the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships on March 20 in St. Louis.Credit: Courtesy of TNSTwo weeks removed from making history with his fourth individual national title, Ohio State redshirt-senior Logan Stieber has put his collegiate accolades on the back burner for an even bigger desire — the 2016 Olympics.“It has always been a dream of mine to be an Olympian and to win gold,” Stieber said. “Doing that would be a great conclusion to my competitive career.”Stieber was awarded the Hodge Trophy, which is equivalent to what the Heisman is for football, on Monday. On that same day, he was also supporting his younger brother, Hunter, who was in surgery to attach a ligament in his right elbow.“The Hodge has been a goal of mine since my sophomore year,” Stieber said. “I would say it’s one of the highest honors I have received, and to have my brother come out of surgery OK as well, it made for a great day.”The four-time Big Ten and National Champion finished his career at OSU with a 119-3 record and was named the Big Ten Most Outstanding Wrestler and Most Outstanding Wrestler of the Big Ten Championships. Even after receiving these major individual awards, Stieber managed to keep his focus on his teammates, and is able to stay calm on the biggest of stages.“I have been blessed to be in a lot of big matches and moments in my life and I think I have learned from each one,” Stieber said. “That keeps me calm.”With a winning percentage of .975 — a school record — Stieber is used to being on top of the podium. Now he’s focused on remaining there as he looks to make the U.S. World Team this summer in hopes of qualifying for the Summer Olympics next year in Brazil.“I believe I can make the team and win gold,” Stieber said. Olympic wrestling uses the freestyle form of wrestling instead of the folkstyle used in college. Despite the different style, Stieber said, with the help of known World Team members such as former Buckeye Reece Humphrey, he will be able to make the transition quickly.“The freestyle circuit is different because of the amount of times you compete and the weigh-in rules are different,” Stieber said. “Also the training is more focused on skill and less on conditioning. I’ll be ready.”Looking back on his high school career and the way it ended, Stieber said he couldn’t have written a better script on how similarly he ended his collegiate career. Not only did he win four individual titles at both levels, but he led Monroeville and OSU to their first-ever team titles as well.“To have him win his fourth title on the same day as winning the team’s first is incredible,” Stieber’s father, Jeff, said. “It was always one of his biggest goals to do that and to see it happen is truly amazing.”Stieber finished his career on a 50-match winning streak dating back to December 2013, and won 96 of his 119 matches via bonus points. He tied for the most career falls in OSU history with 50 and also became just the second wrestler ever to win four Cliff Keen Las Vegas Collegiate Invitational titles.Once again, the individual accolades have piled up, but he stressed they don’t compare to the success he shares with his teammates.“Winning individual awards and achieving personal goals is something I obviously want to do, but being able to share a team title with my family and friends has been pretty cool,” Stieber said.Instead of taking it all in and enjoying the moment, wrestling season hasn’t ended for Stieber. He has already begun training for the 2015 Las Vegas/ASICS Open Wrestling Championships in May and even after he graduates, he still hopes to be a part of OSU and wants to continue to work with the team, he said. “I hope to keep wrestling in Columbus for a while and I want to see our team continue to get better and competing for titles.” read more

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