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first_img May 22, 2020 Press Release,  Public Health Furthering his plan for reopening Pennsylvania, Governor Tom Wolf today announced eight additional counties will move to yellow and 17 to green, effective at 12:01 a.m., May 29. All remaining counties in red are expected to move to yellow by June 5 at 12:01 a.m.The counties moving to yellow on May 29 include Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, and Schuylkill.The 17 counties moving to green, also on May 29, include Bradford, Cameron, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango and Warren.Counties that remain in red on May 29 and are expected to move to yellow by June 5 include Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Northampton, Montgomery, and Philadelphia.“We know not only that we succeeded in slowing case growth, but that our actions, our collective decisions to stay at home and avoid social contact – we know that saved lives,” Gov. Wolf said. “My stay-at-home order did exactly what it was intended to do: It saved lives and it bought us valuable time.”Gov. Wolf referred to a study by Drexel University that indicates that in Philadelphia alone, 60 days of staying at home resulted in more than 7,000 lives saved and prevented more than 68,000 people from needing hospitalization.Yellow MetricsIn deciding which counties to move to yellow, the state used risk-based metrics from Carnegie Mellon University combined with contact tracing and testing capability and a sustained reduction in COVID-19 hospitalizations. While the 50 new cases per 100,000 population was considered, it did not weigh any more heavily than other factors.Over the past two weeks:The state has seen sustained reductions in hospitalizations. From May 8 when the first counties moved to yellow to yesterday, the number of COVID-19 patients hospitalized dropped by nearly one thousand – from 2,618 to 1,667.The number of COVID patients on ventilators shrank by about a third, from 505 to 347.New cases continue to decline: From May 8 to May 15, the state added 6,384 cases and from May 15 to 21, added 4,770.The current COVID-19 incidence rate in the state is 83.4 cases per 100,000 people. Two weeks ago, it was 113.6 per 100,000. Most other states are seeing their new case rate continue to increase or remain flat. Pennsylvania is one of just 19 states with new case-rate declines.Green MetricsCounties that have been in the yellow phase for the requisite 14 days have been closely monitored for the risk associated with transitioning to the green phase.In the green phase, we will continue to take precautions, including reducing building capacity, encouraging teleworking, limiting visitation in certain high-risk environments, and preventing large entertainment gatherings.The guidelines for moving to green are available here, and include specifics for employers, large events, and social gatherings.Moving Forward“We continue to increase testing every day and are continuing to build our contact tracing capacity, as well,” Gov. Wolf said. “We are able to do these things, to be successful, to reopen in this manner because of the Pennsylvanians who have made tremendous sacrifices since the virus emerged in our state,” Gov Wolf said. “Thank you.“I want to remember and honor all of those who we lost and give solace to their family and loved ones. The last two months have been trying and they have tested each of us, and I want to thank and acknowledge all the people of our commonwealth who have been called upon to upend their lives to keep their neighbors, friends and family safe.”Ver esta página en español. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Gov. Wolf Adds Eight Counties to Yellow and 17 to Green on May 29, Remainder to Yellow on June 5last_img read more

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Columbus Blue Jackets coach John Tortorella fined $20,000 for expletive-filled rant

first_imgThe NHL fined Columbus Blue Jackets head coach John Tortorella $20,000 on Wednesday for his his expletive-filled rant crticizing how officials managed the clock in overtime of his team’s shootout loss to the Chicago Blackhawks on Dec. 29.In addition, Tortorella — known as one of the league’s most fiery personalities — has been assessed a $25,000 conditional fine that will be collected if he exhibits “similar innapropriate behavior” between now and Dec. 29, 2020. “So the chain of events, if it was done right, [is] we don’t lose our goalie [and] we win the hockey game,” he added. “So, all this goddamn technology, right? The technology and getting things right . . . the stubbornness tonight by the officials, and by the league, and Toronto, however it’s supposed to goddamn work, screws us. It’s ridiculous.”According to the Athletic’s Aaron Portzline, Tortorella apologized for his rant the next day and said he showed a lack of discipline for airing his grievances with officiating in public rather than addressing it with the league privately.Prior to Tortorella’s fine, NHL director of hockey operations Colin Campbell reportedly called Tortorella’s comments “unprofessional and unacceptable.” The 2010s: Crosby named NHL Athlete of the Decade | NHL All-Decade TeamTortorella’s comments stemmed from an incident during Sunday’s game in which time ran off the game clock after the Blackhawks were assessed a penalty in overtime and was not added back. Later, Columbus’ Zach Werenski went on to score what seemed to be the game-winner, except time had expired slightly before the puck crossed the goal line — prompting Tortorella to say the referees “don’t do their freaking job.”A furious John Tortorella on how he believes the officials mismanaged the clock at the end of overtime.#CBJ | @BlueJacketsNHL pic.twitter.com/UWMw96F3FX— FOX Sports Columbus (@FOXSportsCbus) December 30, 2019″The whistle is blown at 19.2 on the clock. For some reason the clock is run down a second and a tenth to 18.1. Whatever reason, I have no goddamn idea,” Tortorella said during the postgame press conference. “So instead of resetting the clock, we have them tell our captain, ‘We’re not going to do it.’ [The NHL office in] Toronto doesn’t step in, refs don’t do their freaking job and now we lose the game, and we lose our goalie.”Blue Jackets goaltender Joonas Korpisalo suffered a knee injury during that shootout and will remain out for multiple weeks — something Tortorella said would not have happened if that Werenski goal stood.last_img read more

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Lacey Rotary Offers Educational Needs Grants

first_imgFacebook5Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The Rotary Club of LaceyLocal non-profit groups are encouraged to apply for an Educational Needs Grant (up to $1,000 each) for the 2015-16 year through the Rotary Club of Lacey. The funds are designated to promote education needs in the community and meet one-time needs (not to be part of a non-profit’s regular budget). Specific requests are encouraged! Please send a one-page letter of request with the following information about your need:Information about your organization, including EIN or nonprofit number,Specific amount requested, andSpecific need.The grant does not give endowments, capital funds, fundraisers or individuals (student trips, etc.). Direct needs only.Send requests by May 31 to Lacey Rotary, Education Needs Committee Chair, PO Box 3301, Lacey WA 98503.last_img read more

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Leonardo Marina Shows Off Its New Office Building

first_imgBy Matt Lobosco |MIDDLETOWN – After years of fighting to recover from Super Storm Sandy, the Leonardo boating community took a huge step in its recovery from the storm.On Saturday, June 10, officials from the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) joined boaters, local officials and summer visitors to celebrate National Marina Day by unveiling the marina’s new office building. The day-long event began with a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the building and included kayak tours, and craft and food vendors.Open since 1963, Leonardo State Marina is one of New Jersey’s six state marinas. The 17-acre facility along the shores of Sandy Hook Bay provides 176 berths for boaters as well as numerous educational programs for young people during the summer. However, several structures which provided services crucial to the operation of the marina were completely destroyed by Sandy, including its garage, its office, and its public restrooms.Now the marina has a brand new building to provide virtually all the services lost from the storm. Along with restoring office space for the marina staff, the building provides new showers, bathrooms, a lobby area and a multipurpose room including a kitchenette, tables and chairs.The one-story structure stands across from the marina on the other side of Concord Avenue, which runs the length of the harbor.(Left to right) Robert DeCotiis of Master Consulting Engineers, Ed Mulvane of the Department of Property Management and Construction, Ron Sebring of Ronald A. Sebring Associates, LLC, Monmouth County Freeholder Serena DiMaso, DEP Assistant Commissioner Rich Boornazian and Superintendent of Parks and Forestry Maggie Mitchell gather to cut the ribbon to signify the official opening of the new office building.“This marina has been here for years. If you took a ride up the coast here, the boats all got lifted up and corralled and a lot of them were out of the water. This place was devastated,” said Richard Boornazian, DEP assistant commissioner. “We think this is a vibrant community. So it’s not only a service, it’s an amenity to have this marina here. This is a great boating community and we want to keep it here.”Boornazian said he was at the marina two days after the storm and could not believe the devastation. He emphasized his excitement over the hard work of the staff and the enthusiasm of the community for getting the office built. For as destructive as Sandy was, the staff and the town saw this as an opportunity to make the marina even better.Maggie Mitchell, superintendent of the parks and forestry division of the DEP, shared Boornazian’s outlook. “Opening this building and getting this open benefits everyone in the community,” she said.Ronald Sebring, owner of Ronald A. Sebring Associates, LLC and creator of the blueprint for architecture of the office building, echoed the feelings of the marina staff about the opportunity brought on by this project. He said he believed the facilities that existed prior to Sandy had many issues that were essentially being covered with Band-Aids. Sebring said the facilities “in my mind needed updating” and Sandy brought an opportunity to fix those issues.Perhaps the new building can serve as a small silver lining in what has been a difficult recovery from Sandy. After five years of looking for a source of stimulation and excitement, the Leonardo community appears galvanized by the construction of the marina’s new office building.“This is a great community. I love the way things turned out. This building will last for a very long time,” Boornazian said.This article was first published in the June 15-June 22, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Neptunes shine against BC’s best at BCSSA Championships

first_imgMedals are generally hard to come by for Interior clubs when competing at the BC Summer Swim Association Championships.However, this is a different Nelson Neptunes team.The road warriors from Nelson continued their success away from home as the Heritage City Club did not look out of place at the provincial meet held this past weekend in Coquitlam.“Twelve Neptunes and Head Coach Cynthia Pfeiffer endured the heat wave to finish with six medals, eight consolation final swims, 11 final swims and over 90 percent best times,” said Neptune head coach Cynthia Pfeiffer. Pfeiffer said the Neptunes were led by Lachlan Bibby-Fox and Jaylen Rushton, who were able to qualify in the A finals in all four events entered. Bibby-Fox started the Neptunes off on the right foot Friday by claiming the firsts medal for the Kootenays, with a bronze in 100-meter Individual medley.Sunday Bibby-Fox added his first ever silver provincial medal to his count in the 50-meter breaststroke.Rushton followed his momentum in the 100-meter individual medley, claiming the silver medal.Rushton also won bronze medals in both the 50-meter Freestyle and 50-meter Butterfly, and finishing a close fourth in her 50-meter Breaststroke. Pfeiffer also added to the medal count by finishing thirrd in the 100-meter Backstroke.Pfeiffer and Rushton teamed up with Olivia Cowan and Joanna Blishen combined to qualify in the final of the 4 x 50-meter Medley relay where they finished in eighth spot against much older swimmers.Cowan also qualified into the final in her 100-meter backstroke, where she finished eighth and was able to shave off one more second.Pfeiffer said other highlighted swims include Evan Chouinard knocking off five seconds in his 100-meter freestyle and Enna Cowan’s two second best time in her 50-meter butterfly. “With the (Nelson and District Community Complex) pool opening on October 17 the Neptunes are itching to get back to their home,” Pfeiffer said.“The winter maintenance program where they swim two hours a week, will begin shortly after the pool opening.”last_img read more

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