上海品茶安全吗

Alumnus-Parent Publishes Management Book

first_img Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News Community News Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities People Don’t Love AnymoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS 19 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business: Retail News Alumnus-Parent Publishes Management Book From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, January 1, 2014 | 5:24 pm More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News Eddie Loussararian (CT ’90), a Bosco alumnus and the father of freshman Shant Loussararian, recently published a book on management and leadership, “When Bosses Go Wild—Preventing Employee Morale Knockouts.”Currently being used by SUBWAY, the YMCA, and three universities, the book is a valuable resource for managers, employees and students preparing to enter the workforce. It offers time-tested techniques for managers and employees to peacefully co-exist and stay motivated in the workplace, as well as sections to help individuals plan a positive course of action when they encounter a workplace interpersonal challenge.“Over my 20-year management career, I have witnessed both positive role models and managers who have not yet embraced the concept of employee engagement,” said Eddie. “By writing “When Bosses Go Wild,” I set out to empower employees to enrich their job, and to help managers master the vital skills needed to improve morale at the workplace.”“In some cases,” he explained, “managers may be the only people to speak words of encouragement to their employees. Words are powerful. Let’s choose them wisely and make them count. You’ll never know the power that is contained in these techniques unless you give them a try.”“When Bosses Go Wild,” is available in paperback or ebook and can be purchased through Amazon.com, CreateSpace.com, or by emailing [email protected] for a signed copy.Don Bosco Technical Institute, 1151 San Gabriel Blvd., Rosemead, (626) 940-2000 or visit www.boscotech.edu. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Read More

first_imgLeonid Ikan/iStock(NEW YORK) — The coldest air of the season is hitting the East Coast on Friday — and it’s only going to get colder.A freeze warning has been issued from the South to New York City as the first freezing temperatures of the season are on their way.Saturday morning, the wind chill could fall to 27 degrees in Atlanta, 17 degrees in Boston and 14 degrees in Chicago.Here is your cheat sheet for how to brave the frigid weather, from what to wear outside to what to remember when you’re driving.This story was originally published the winter of 2017 – 2018.How to stay safe outsideThose with prolonged exposure or those not dressed appropriately for the weather are in danger of frostbite and hypothermia, National Weather Service meteorologist Jay Engle told ABC News.Frostbite results in the loss of feeling and color in affected areas — usually the nose, ears, cheeks, fingers, toes or chin, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Frostbite could potentially cause permanent damage and, in severe cases, can lead to amputation, the CDC said.Someone suffering from frostbite can be unaware of it because tissues that become frozen are numb, the CDC said. These are all signs of frostbite: numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, or skin that feels unusually firm or waxy.“Don’t rub your hands — if you have frost-nip or frostbite, rubbing actually causes tissue damage,” Dr. Randall Wexler, professor of family medicine at Ohio State University, told ABC News.If you think you are developing frostbite, “keep the area covered if you can … because if you have frostbite on your hand and you pull off your glove, you may cause tissue damage,” Wexler said.He added, “That’s also when you want to start trying to raise your core body temperature — get rid of wet clothes, put on clothes that are warm and dry.”There’s also hypothermia — or abnormally low body temperature — which can impact the brain, “making the victim unable to think clearly or move well,” the CDC said. “This makes hypothermia especially dangerous, because a person may not know that it’s happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.”Warning signs for adults are shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech and drowsiness. Warning signs for infants are bright red or cold skin and very low energy, the CDC said.Engle recommends to “dress in three or more layers. One big thick winter coat tends not to do the trick. You have to have a thick sweater underneath and then a lighter jacket on top of that and then your winter coat.”“People really should keep their heads covered because that’s where majority of heat gets lost,” Engle added.Wexler said moving can generate heat. But try to avoid sweating.“If you are overheated and start to sweat, that lowers your body temperature and makes you more susceptible to cold injury,” he said. “You want to be able to adjust your layers, zip and unzip.”Wexler also recommended staying hydrated because “dehydration can help promote cold injury.”The young and elderly should be especially careful in the cold.“Their ability to maintain core body temperature is harder than mid-age and younger adults,” he said. “Kids, especially babies, lose a disproportionate amount of heat from their head — that’s why you want to have a hat on their head when you’re out there. Older people are more at risk simply because it is more difficult to regulate our core body temperature as we get older.”It’s also more difficult to maintain your core temperature if you are diabetic or taking decongestant antihistamines or certain blood pressure medications, Wexler said.How to keep your car safeWhen the temperature dips, getting behind the wheel can prove to be a challenge. Problems include dead car batteries, iced-over windshields, broken car locks and driving with no traction.Audra Fordin, founder of Woman Auto Know and the owner of Great Bear Auto Repair in Queens, N.Y., provided these tips:1. Before you hit the road, check under the hood.“If it’s really cold outside, you want to make sure that your battery is going to be good in the freezing cold weather,” Fordin said. “If you see any snow or blue stuff that’s growing off your battery, that’s an indication you want to go to the shop to have your battery checked.”2. Iced out windshields? Turn to your wallet for help.“If you get to your car and can’t see, pull out a credit card, and you can just wipe that frost away,” Fordin said.3. Fighting a stubborn car lock? Get sanitizing.“If your lock is frozen, put the sanitizer on the key, and then put the key into the lock,” Fordin said.4. If your car can’t gain traction, let your floor mat give an assist.“Grab your floor mat, you’re going to put it underneath the wheel,” Fordin said. “That will give you enough traction to pull your car out and hit the road.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgGregg Popovich hired Tim Duncan as an assistant coach with the Spurs, but that doesn’t mean he’ll stop roasting his former franchise star.Popovich dropped a typically sarcastic line about Duncan’s coaching expertise (or lack thereof), per Marc Stein of the New York Times. “He probably won’t do anything, just sit on the bench and sip tea.”USA Basketball assistant Steve Kerr on new Spurs assistant Tim Duncan: “He’s already told the rest of the staff that he’s the only one who’s not fireable. He’s right. Pop can’t fire Tim Duncan. He probably won’t do anything, just sit on the bench and sip tea.” pic.twitter.com/LpgPbJxvEt— Ben Golliver (@BenGolliver) August 5, 2019The Duncan-Popovich partnership powered the Spurs to incredible heights when Duncan was playing. The first pick of the 1997 draft, Duncan went on to win five titles, two MVP awards, and 15 All-NBA nods.If Duncan’s success translates to the coaching bench, the Spurs could continue to be one of the NBA’s premier teams for years to come. “Tim Duncan doesn’t know a lick about coaching,” said Popovich. “I don’t even know why I hired him.”Unless Popovich is second-guessing his hire, we can safely assume this is another example of his famously dry wit.When the Duncan hire was first announced in July, Popovich provided the first clue that he would keep ribbing Duncan.”It is only fitting, that after I served loyally for 19 years as Tim Duncan’s assistant, that he returns the favor.”pic.twitter.com/xVMRKFQGdv— San Antonio Spurs (@spurs) July 23, 2019Warriors head coach and USA Basketball assistant Steve Kerr isn’t worried about Duncan’s job security.  “He’s already told the rest of the staff that he’s the only one who’s not fireable. He’s right. Pop can’t fire Tim Duncan,” said Kerr, per Ben Golliver.last_img read more

Read More