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Geordan Murphy sinks Saracens with late drop goal at Vicarage Road

first_imgTuesday Feb 21, 2012 Geordan Murphy sinks Saracens with late drop goal at Vicarage Road Leicester Tigers pulled of an incredible last minute win over Saracens at Vicarage Road on Sunday, beating them 20-19 thanks to a dropgoal by Geordan Murphy after 26 phases of play. It was Saracens’ first defeat at home in over a year.  As Toby Flood considered the dropkick while the forwards built the perfect platform, skipper Murphy sensed it was his duty to take control as he stepped into position. As you can see in the video below, he took responsibility and landed it perfectly, despite it being a wobbly old kick.The 33 year old Irishman’s kick kept Leicester’s Aviva Premiership play-off hopes alive, and says that the win was all about their desire, something they focussed on during the week.“We spoke about a few things after the loss at Exeter. The boys responded well,” said Murphy.“It was incredibly difficult to keep hold of the ball for 26 phases at the end of the Sarries game, but we really wanted it and it was great to be part of a Tigers team that wants to win for each other so much. Our reaction at the end of the game showed what it meant to the guys. “After they had gone ahead with two minutes left, we got the ball back under our own sticks and many teams would have capitulated from there, 90 metres out. But we came up, fought our way up the field and I can’t speak highly enough of the forwards, they won the game for us.”Coach Richard Cockerill was full of praise for Murphy though, especially after the week’s goings on. “Geordan was instrumental in leading the talk after last week. He spoke a few home truths to the lads who are new to the squad and don’t understand what Leicester is built on. It was pretty apt that he kicked the drop goal, because he’s done what Leicester greats do and that’s lead from the front.”ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHere’s the Purpose of These Little Bumps in the F and J Keys on Your KeyboardNueeyShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Charities face £10.1 billion funding gap over next six months

first_imgCharities face £10.1 billion funding gap over next six months  540 total views,  2 views today “The figures are highly concerning and are broadly in line with emerging findings from our joint survey of charities with the IoF, NCVO and PWC, full details of which we hope to release next week.“As we look towards planning for post Covid-19 recovery and the impending economic crisis, it’s essential to the nation’s economic and social recovery that government invest in and use civil society expertise, knowledge and networks to help rebuild. The work of charities is never more needed to support people and communities hardest hit by Covid-19.“Recent research shows that the original projected loss of income to the sector of £4.3bn to May 2020 was largely correct and that set against the government’s response to date of £750m, the gap is ever widening and impact on beneficiaries felt ever more keenly precisely at a time when charities are needed the most and have the vital services that people need.” Tagged with: COVID-19 Finance Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 UK charities are facing a £10.1 billion funding gap over the next six months as a result of Covid-19, with incomes expected to drop by £6.7 billion at the same time as demand for their support rises by the equivalent of £3.4 billion, according to new analysis from Pro Bono Economics (PBE).The analysis draws on Pro Bono Economic’s latest weekly charity tracker survey, covering 261 civil society organisations across the UK. 88% of those responding say they expect Covid-19 to reduce their income over the coming six months relative to pre-crisis plans, and well over half (59%) say they have had to significantly reduce their activity in response.Many charities have sought additional funding, with half saying they have applied for emergency support from non-government sources and more than one-in-three (37%) applying for a share of the £900 million of support earmarked for the sector by the government. However, PBE points out that with these sources not available to all, one-in-ten (12%) of charities say they expect to cease operating altogether before the start of December.Simultaneously, there has been a sharp increase in demand for the services of many charities with the survey showing that 72% expect demand to rise over the next six months in response to the crisis. To meet this surge in demand, PBE estimates that the sector would require an additional £3.4 billion of resource, meaning that the estimated £6.7 billion income hit is generating an overall funding ‘gap’ of some £10.1 billion.PBE says that small charities, with incomes of less than £500,000 a year, are especially exposed to the income squeeze. Its survey suggests that close to two-in-three (63%) in this group have already reduced their activity in a significant way, with 45% saying they have grown more pessimistic about their situation over the past week, and that one-in-eight (13%) expecting to go out of business within six months.Matt Whittaker, Chief Executive of Pro Bono Economics, commented:“If we don’t funnel more resource to charities in the coming weeks, it’s clear that many will struggle to survive.“The fact that one-in-ten charities expect to go under in the next six months is on its own a shocking enough statistic. But once we add in the significant constraints being faced by many of those organisations that do survive, we’re looking at a huge hit to the overall capacity of the sector – with implications for all of us.“The significant scale of the support being provided by government is of course very welcome – as is the generous help being provided by the public in the form of donations and volunteering – but it’s not enough. Charities’ incomes are under great strain at precisely the same time that demand for their assistance is rising, generating a £10.1 billion funding gap that translates into huge unmet demand.”Roberta Fusco, Director Policy and Communications, CFG on behalf of a coalition of charities coming together in the #NeverMoreNeeded campaign, also commented, saying: Advertisement About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  541 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 Melanie May | 10 June 2020 | Newslast_img read more

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first_imgTop StoriesWest Bengal Post-Poll Violence : Supreme Court To Hear Next Week Plea For Compensation & Rehabilitation Of Victims, SIT Probe Radhika Roy21 May 2021 10:18 PMShare This – xThe Supreme Court will hear next week a plea seeking directions to stop/prevent the alleged State-sponsored violence in West Bengal in wake of the State Assembly elections results , as well as the constitution of an SIT to investigate the same and take appropriate action against the culprits in reported incidents.It further prays for the formation of a Commission for rehabilitation of displaced persons, compensation for loss of family members, property, livelihood, and mental and emotional agony. The matter was mentioned by Senior Advocate Pinky Anand before a Bench of Justices Vineet Saran and BR Gavai. Anand submitted that 1 lakh persons had been displaced in the violence that took place and there was a need to hear the matter. The Bench has accordingly listed the matter for next week.The petitioners are Arun Mukherjee, Debjani Halder, Prosanta Das, Paramita Dey and Bhupen Halder. As per the petition, Mukherjee and Halder are social activists, Das is a victim of post-poll violence on Kooch Behar district, Dey and Halder are advocates practicing in West Bengal whose homes and offices were destroyed by TMC workers. The plea, filed through Advocate Shruti Agarwal and drawn by Advocate Veer Vikrant Singh, submits that the Petitioners are aggrieved by the post-electoral violence in West Bengal “causing bombing, murder, gangrape, outraging of modesty of women, arson, kidnapping, loot, vandalism and destruction of public property, which led to a widespread fear and terror in the minds of ordinary residents of the State, ultimately forcing them to leave their homes”. It has further been averred that the police and the State-sponsored “goons are in cahoots” as the police has been a mere spectator, allegedly discouraging and threatening victims from filing FIRs and not investigating the cases. Despite the coverage of the violence by various media platforms and suo moto cognizance taken by various government organisations and autonomous institutions, the State Government has provided no support or assistance. “The Exodus of the people in West Bengal due to state sponsored violence has posed serious humanitarian issues related to their survival, where they are forced to live in deplorable conditions, in violation of their fundamental rights enshrined under Article 21 of the Constitution of India.” In light of the above, the instant plea has been filed. Last week, the Supreme Court had issued notice on a plea seeking SIT/CBI probe into the killings of two BJP activists, allegedly at the behest of Trinamool Congress, on the day of election results.TagsSupreme Court Post Election Violence Case West Bengal Justice Vineet Saran Justice BR Gavai Next Storylast_img read more

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first_imgLindaParton/iStock(FLINT, Mich.) — Just after dawn, Michigan Senate Minority Leader Jim Ananich wakes up. Bleary-eyed, he shuffles downstairs to the kitchen. He can already hear his 4-year-old son, Jake, softly stirring in his room. Jake likes to ease into the day, but soon he’ll emerge, hungry.Jake wants oatmeal. Jim reaches in the cupboard for their big Quaker Oats variety box, picking cinnamon. A half-full 35-count value pack of purified water is perched on top of the fridge. More bottles are stacked on the shelves inside.Ananich grabs strawberries and two water bottles, light bouncing off their clear plastic ridges. He snaps the caps’ seals and pours the water over a few fat, red berries. Snap. Another bottle for the instant oats.Ananich will use filtered water for his coffee, but for Jake it’s always pure, bottled water. He doesn’t let his son turn on the faucet. The kitchen sink remains untouched.In Flint, Michigan, that’s what you do.It’s been five years since the city’s water crisis was began. Now, even after officials have said the situation is vastly improved, Flint residents’ trust in their water — and in their government — is badly corroded.“It’s this invisible fear — and I can’t think of a day when it’s not there,” Ananich said. “You can’t see the lead poisoning. But it’s a constant thing — that maybe they’re lying again.”Repairing that trust takes, among other things, time. But if the people of Flint are aiming for more prosecutions in the water probe, the clock’s ticking down. A crucial statute of limitations for one of the most prevalent crimes in the case, misconduct in office, will expire in the spring of 2020. And so would much of the city’s hope for justice.Ananich and his colleague, state Rep. John Cherry, D-Flint, are pushing to change that, exclusively telling ABC News they plan to introduce a bill Wednesday morning to extend that statute. It allows prosecutors to seek legal action against emergency managers, department leaders, local officials or any other public leaders who may be responsible for what happened in Flint.That extension holds huge potential: It would mean four more years to review 20 million newly uncovered documents, for due process to breathe properly and for an investigation to come to full term.“We want to make sure prosecutors have the time they need to process the voluminous amount of new evidence they’ve got now that were not turned over before,” Cherry told ABC News. “And not to rush it. Human memory is so fragile … but because this will rely on so much documentary evidence, it really avoids any potential he-said-she-said.”Ananich added, “It’s so simple, but so important.”“The case was bungled from day one. Now, time is of the essence,” he said. “We’ve got to make sure this case gets the time and energy it deserves. We just can’t allow time to be the rationale for not achieving that justice.”Earning back trust will take time, and it will take accountability. The new bill’s language takes special heed of who might be implicated in the case — any public official — without gray areas or loopholes.The city’s saga strikes deep and personal for Ananich: He and his wife both grew up, and spent most of their lives, in Flint. Now, they’re raising their son there. Jake is adopted and was in utero just as the water crisis was born.“When Jake was a baby, oh boy, all these things go through your head — we obviously couldn’t breastfeed, so I’m thinking, how could I wash the bottles? You know, you just want to protect him. You rethink all your habits — your hand halts, you’d look at that faucet, and think … I dunno,” Ananich says. “I take responsibility very seriously that I’m a servant of Flint — and a father of Flint. And I ask myself from the beginning — could I have done more?”This bill buys time and a crucial step towards closure. But the question now is whether the Republican-led legislature will go along with the move. ABC News has reached out to Michigan Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey and Speaker of the House Lee Chatfield for comment, but has not received any replies.Ananich and Cherry both expressed optimism about the potential for bipartisan support.“This affects people in either party,” Cherry said. “I don’t think this really has a partisan atmosphere to it. Government accountability is important to people on both sides of the aisle. I’m not convinced this will fall along party lines.”“The politics of water are everywhere now, and I won’t play hot potato with the blame. I’m not putting my finger on the scale — and we’re not doing this to ‘get’ people — it’s whatever is needed to give people justice is what I’m fighting for,” Ananich said. “I would hope [Republicans] would agree. Maybe I’m being too naive, but I’m optimistic. I’m less optimistic than before the water crisis started, but we keep the lines of communication open here, and I think this is one where we can get a win for the citizens of Michigan.”“When you leave your Capitol office, you’re still a human being, right? And, I think, if you’re thinking about this from an empathetic standpoint, and you think, ‘This happened right in my community, my people, myself included,’ it’s not who’s to blame — Democrat, Republican lens — you look at it as this never should have happened,” he added.When the city’s source of water was first switched in 2014, it was meant as a money-saving move: disconnecting from Detroit’s water line and drawing from the Flint River instead.But the water wasn’t treated properly, allowing lead to leach from the pipes. With a flick of one small black button on the city’s north side, that defining spring day in 2014, the city’s fate shifted.Fifteen people who worked in the Michigan state and local government were criminally charged in connection to the water crisis — over 65 other officials’ cellphones and other information were seized. Then, state prosecutors announced they were dropping the charges in favor of launching a new and expanded investigation.Three of the 15 originally charged have already taken a plea deal. Charges against the others include felony misconduct in office, willful neglect of duty to conspiracy and involuntary manslaughter. If those charges are revived, they could touch top officials in Flint and Michigan governments who stand accused of saying the water was fine.In this new probe, Solicitor General Fadwa Hammoud and Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy have said they are not precluded from refiling charges against defendants or adding new charges and additional defendants.But that all depends on the case carrying forward in time.What’s next for Flint turns with the tide of Congress and the new investigation.“I can’t tell you when I’ll be satisfied,” Ananich said. “I’m always hesitant to say if I ever will be with Flint. There’s so much damage. I want people to think twice before they think they can pull this again. And I want them to know there are consequences. But I have hope we can take this tragedy and turn it into something for the good.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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