June 2021

Saxons book final place in trying times for Tonga

first_imgReferee: R Poite (French)Att: 5357 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Billy Twelvetrees on his way to scoring a tryEngland Saxons  41Tonga 14England Saxons booked their place in the Churchill Cup final against Canada by destroying the Tonga pack in the Kingsholm rain. Stuart Lancaster’s side were awarded a hat-trick of penalty tries as a Jordan Crane inspired forward effort took Tonga apart with the captain himself and Billy Twelvetrees also getting on the scoresheet.It sets up a repeat of last year’s final against the Canucks – England won 38-18 – and Saxons Head Coach Stuart Lancaster said: “I thought our scrummaging was outstanding. We gave a couple of kgs away per man but technically we were better. If you’d have said at the start of the game that we were going to win 41-14 I would have taken that.  Our objective was to reach the final and now we want to win it – last year Canada gave us a real hard game and I am sure it will be the same this time.”Tonga will now play Italy A in the Plate final and their coach Isitolo Maka said: “It was a very tough match. I am very disappointed with the penalty tries. Without them we would have been in the game.”The Saxons broke through after just 11 minutes when referee Roman Poite lost patience with the collapsing Tongan scrum and awarded a penalty try which Rory Clegg converted. And four minutes later they were 14-0 up when Crane picked up and drove over to give Clegg another two points.Tonga struggled to make any inroads into the Saxons 22 with their only good run coming from centre Suka Hufanga but the move broke down. The Saxons pack were in the ascendency as they sent the Tongan scrum upwards and backwards and Poite headed to the posts for another penalty try.Right on halftime Clegg made it 24-0 with a penalty and the Saxons continued to turn the screw early in the second half when the fly half landed another. However, Tonga refused to throw in the towel and they were rewarded for their endeavour to take the line-out rather than penalty kick when captain Kisi Pulu took the ball at the back and when the ball was recycled Scarlets bound- Sione Timani drove over.But it was small respite as the Saxons forwards overpowered their opponents in another scrum and Poite awarded a hat-trick of penalty tries in the 63rd minute and Ofa Fainga’anuku was yellow carded for his sins.Mike Brown made an impact when he came on and made a midfield break before Crane showed some deft footwork with a grubberkick for Twelvetrees to gather and score. That was the end of Twelvetrees’ involvement as he was sent to the sinbin and Pepa Kolomotangi scored a consolation try when he picked up and drove over. GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – JUNE 12: Billy Twelvetrees of England Saxons breaks away from Suka Hufanga to score a try during the Churchill Cup match between England Saxons and Tonga at Kingsholm on June 12, 2011 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) England Saxons: A Goode (M Brown 55); C Sharples, H Trinder (J Turner-Hall 58), B Twelvetrees, T Ojo; R Clegg, P Hodgson (M Young 63); M Mullan (K Brookes 63), D Paice (J Gray 55), M Stevens, M Botha, D Attwood, J Gaskell (G Kitchener 69), T Johnson (J Gibson 72) J Crane (capt).Yellow cards: Twelvetrees 73Scorers: Tries: pen try (3); Crane, Twelvetrees; Pens: Clegg (2); Cons: Clegg (5)Tonga: E Paea; V Helu, S Hufanga, S Fonua, V Iongi; K Morath, D Morath (S Havea 55); T Lea’aetoa (O Fainga’anuku 55), S Telefoni (A Halangahu 58), K Polu (capt), S Timani (T Ula 63) E Kauhenga (P Hehea 47), J Afu, P Koloamatangi, P Mapakaitolo (Lea’aetoa 62). Reps (not used): M  Malupo, S Taumoepeau.Scorers: Tries: Timani, Kolomotangi; Cons: K Morath (2).Yellow card: O Fainga’anuku 62-72last_img read more

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Increase your speed: the shuttle test

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THIS MONTH we’re all about speed! John Dams, Harlequins head of performance, has designed a workout to help you increase your speed – a key focus of Quins’ training. It appears in the November edition of Rugby World, and to work extra hard, why not try this shuttle test – or, more accurately, RHIET (Repeated High Intensity Endurance Test). It’s a good way of testing your endurance, and keeping track of how your speed is improving. See how it’s done below!last_img read more

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National lottery: three ways rugby’s eligibility rules must change

first_imgLet us know what you think on this issue by emailing [email protected] or via social media, Twitter: @rugbyworldmag and Facebook: Rugby World Magazine.This article originally appeared in the August 2015 issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here. Find out how to download the digital edition here. Refreshingly, Horsman now works as a skills coach for the WRU. Many of those who qualify on residency grounds, and even those who are eligible through their relatives, head home once the international honours – not to mention the financial rewards – have dried up.Solution: Increase the residency requirement to 60 consecutive monthsA commitment of at least five years to become eligible for another country means the players themselves have to really buy into the switch. They would be sacrificing the opportunity to play in at least one RWC for their home country and over the five-year period would develop a greater understanding of their future country, assimilating into local culture and so on.On top of the increased level of commitment from the players, a five-year term could also deter unions from scouring the globe for possible ‘projects’ because the financial outlay would be that much higher. Not only could they save the money spent on the wages of those players brought in but they also wouldn’t need to pay scouts to source such players. Pump those savings into grass-roots rugby and academies, develop home-grown talent and unions won’t need project players.Problem: Lack of national identityI’ve no doubt players are proud to play Test rugby and are determined to produce their best, but how much does which shirt they’re wearing matter? I believe they should have an affiliation with who and what they are representing, to understand the history, culture and values of that nation, to have pride in not only playing at the top level but representing the people of that country.Supporters should also be able to relate to those playing for their country, the people representing them on the international stage. International players should inspire the next generation. Robbie Henshaw is a Connacht lad, he came up through the age grades to play for his local province and has gone on to represent Ireland. His progress demonstrates to the mini players in the Connacht area that there is a pathway to reach the sport’s highest levels, his success encourages more local youngsters to take up the game. Can the same be said of a player flown in from overseas?Winging in: Fiji-born Noa Nakaitaci scores for France against England. Photo: Getty ImagesThere has been much unrest in France over the number of overseas-born players being picked by Philippe Saint-André recently, with the likes of Scott Spedding, Rory Kockott, Bernard le Roux, Uini Atonio and Noa Nakaitaci turning out for les Bleus. It’s fair to say not all fans have warmed to the controversial policy.Most of those who come over with a view to qualifying via parents or grandparents at least speak of growing up learning of their heritage. Maitland has recalled how his grandfather, whisky in hand, told stories of growing up in Scotland while Anscombe has spoken of how his Welsh mother named him after Gareth Edwards.It’s not always the case, though. Thomas Waldrom originally moved to England from New Zealand, joining Leicester, with the aim of qualifying to wear the red rose on residency grounds, but during his first season he discovered that he had an English grandmother, which speeded up the process. He told the Leicester Mercury: “I remembered reading that my grandmother was English. I rang up my mum in New Zealand and asked if Nana was born in England. She said yes, and that she also had the birth certificate to prove it.”So Waldrom satisfied the criteria for Regulation Eight – but given that he wasn’t even sure his grandmother was born in England you can hardly say that he felt a loyalty to the country. Compare that to another No 8: Lawrence Dallaglio turned down the chance to play for Italy, land of his father, early in his career because he felt so passionately about being English.Blurred lines: Thomas Waldrom’s gran made him eligible for England. Photo: Action ImagesWhen the Scotland squad was announced for this year’s Six Nations one name jumped out: Hugh Blake. Who? Few had even heard of him. The former New Zealand U20 back-row had arrived in Edinburgh a few weeks previously, had yet to play a game for his new club but was already rated highly enough to be selected in the national squad by dint of the fact he had Scottish grandparents. He started only one game for Edinburgh last season, but will make his Scotland debut against Ireland this weekend after Vern Cotter included him in his RWC 2015 training squad ahead of the likes of Kelly Brown and Chris Fusaro.Solution: One parent must have been born in the country for a player to be eligibleThis doesn’t elimate the problem. Players could still arrive in a country with little or no knowledge of it but qualify for the national team because their mum or dad happened to be born there – but it should mean closer ties than a grandparent they may never have met.One caveat I would propose is that the grandparent rule could still apply for lower-tier nations. Take Fiji, Samoa and Tonga: huge numbers have moved from the Pacific Islands to New Zealand and Australia for better job prospects and given that they already struggle to retain talent, it seems harsh to hinder them further. For rugby to become more competitive at Test level, those lower-tier nations need to improve and the odd native grandparent could help them do that. I’d propose this rule applies for five years and is then reassessed in case it was giving those countries an unfair advantage.On the back foot: Do nations like Fiji and Samoa need more help to retain players? Photo: AFPOn the subject of lower-tier nations, World Rugby should put some of the money generated by the World Cup into a pot for them to compensate their players. Too often there are stories of players either having to put their hands in their own pockets to fund flights and so on or, worse, being asked to retire from Test duty to get more lucrative club contracts. It’s little wonder the financial benefits of playing for a top-tier country are often more attractive, but if World Rugby provided greater financial support to the likes of the Pacific Islands it would at least give those who qualified for two countries reason to pause for thought.As Fiji coach John McKee says: “Players don’t play for Fiji for money – they do it for the pride of representing their country.” If only the same was true across the board. These solutions are not perfect but it would be a start to ensuring the integrity of Test rugby is safeguarded. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS World Rugby’s Regulation Eight has long been a bugbear of mine. The regulation concerns players’ eligibility to play for national representative teams. It states that a player may only play for a country’s senior XV (or their designated second team or sevens side) if they were born in the country, one of their parents or grandparents was born in the country, or they have lived in the country for 36 consecutive months. In my view it is too easy for players to switch from one country to another, often when they have little or no links to their new nation. As the expression goes, too often they look to be ‘flags of convenience’.This is not a new phenomenon. There were plenty of overseas arrivals at the start of the pro era with Scotland’s Kilted Kiwis and Wales’ imports (although ‘Grannygate’ proved their eligibility hadn’t been thoroughly checked), but there now seems to be more movement than ever. I appreciate that the world is now a transient place, with people far more likely to move for work or lifestyle than a century ago. However, I still think a player should have a true allegiance to a country if they are going to represent it on the international sporting stage.Of course, it’s hard to pin all the blame on the players – and the coaches who pick them – when they are simply taking advantage of the rules laid out by rugby’s governing body. It should also be said that rugby’s rules are better than those of cricket or football in the fact that you can no longer represent two countries at senior level. Here I look at the main issues Regulation Eight raises and make suggestions for how the eligibility rules should change…Problem: Confusion over ‘second’ teamsPlayers can’t represent a national team if they have already represented another national team at senior level. However, different countries have different rules on what constitutes a senior level. Sevens counts, providing they play against another national sevens team – on the HSBC Sevens World Series for example. The senior 15-a-side national representative team is self-explanatory: play in a Test match and you are tied to that country (or, as World Rugby describe it, the player has been ‘captured’ by the union).Second string: Steve Shingler in action for Wales U20 in 2011. Photo: Huw Evans AgencyFinally, if a player plays for a country’s ‘next senior 15-a-side national representative team’ they are committed to that nation. But this is where things get tricky. The Saxons are England’s second team and the Wolfhounds Ireland’s, but Wales and France have designated their U20 teams as the next 15-a-side representative team.Remember the case of Steve Shingler a few years back? He’d represented Wales U20, been signed by London Irish as an England-qualified player (his father was born in England), then Scotland picked him in their Six Nations squad (his mother is Scottish). Wales disputed the call-up and it was determined that because Shingler had played for Wales U20 against France U20 (at that stage a player was only ‘captured’ if they had played against another designated second team) he was indeed tied to Wales. But when the player himself isn’t even aware of the fact it shows that the rules aren’t clear.The different ‘second’ teams also mean players can play a lot of representative rugby but not be committed to a union. Brad Barritt represented South Africa U21 and the Emerging Springboks before joining Saracens and subsequently pulling on an England shirt. Riki Flutey and Sean Maitland turned out for New Zealand Maori prior to representing England and Scotland respectively. Gareth Anscombe played for New Zealand U20 but won his first Wales cap against Ireland this month.Solution: Playing for a national representative team at U20 level or above ties you to that countryFirstly, this eradicates any confusion about when an appearance makes you ineligible for another country. The vast majority of U20 players are adults (World Rugby’s regulations say a player has to have ‘reached the age of majority’ (18) for them to be captured anyway) so they are old enough to decide whether they want to forever be tied to one country. If they want to keep their options open, they can turn down the U20 opportunity. Plenty of players make it to Test level despite playing no age-grade representative rugby, just as plenty of players don’t progress after winning such honours.Baby Bok: Brad Barritt represented South Africa before playing for England. Photo: Getty ImagesSecondly, players who have played a high level of representative rugby – say Emerging Springboks, Maori All Blacks or Emerging Ireland – can’t change unions if they don’t make the next step to Test rugby for their original country. That sort of switch inevitably leads to questions over commitment and allegiance.Thirdly, it prevents players from being ‘poached’ by other unions. Three players – Luteru Laulala, Nathaniel Apa and Henry Stowers – who represented Samoa at last year’s U20 World Cup were in New Zealand’s squad at this year’s championship. The Kiwis may have lifted the trophy but Samoa finished last and have been relegated to the U20 Trophy competition.Problem: Project playersThis whole concept riles me. It means scouring the globe for decent players and bringing them to another country with a view to them qualifying to represent that country on the three-year residency rule. And as rugby prepares to enter its second decade as a professional sport, the practice is becoming more commonplace.New Scot: Josh Strauss scores for Glasgow last season. Photo: InphoScotland named two South Africans – Josh Strauss and WP Nel – in their World Cup training squad who don’t yet qualify but will do by the time they take on Japan on 23 September. There’s no doubting that they are quality players – Nel has been a rock in the scrum for Edinburgh and Strauss has excelled in the back row of a Glasgow side he has also captained. But does three years spent in Scotland mean they deserve to don the thistle ahead of players born and bred in the Scottish system?Should countries not focus on developing and generating home-grown talent rather than bringing in foreign players in what is more of a quick-fix (relatively!) solution? Bringing in overseas players actually stunts progress because game time for young, local players is restricted by the new arrivals and they can’t gain experience to develop their own game.And why does the fact a player is from the southern hemisphere automatically make them better than the local lad? It’s almost as if those in the North have an inferiority complex. Surely if a player is that good he would have been selected by his own SANZAR union.Scotland are far from the only side to look to project players. In fact, it was an idea Graham Henry tried out when he was Wales coach more than 15 years ago. Ireland have brought in overseas front-row players with a view to them qualifying on residency as they tried to address what they felt was a shortage of quality props.Giving back: Chris Horsman now works as a WRU coach. Photo: Huw Evans AgnecyI’m not against players qualifying for a different nation via residency, but I think it should be more of an organic process rather than an exploitative one, although that obviously can’t be regulated. Chris Horsman was born in England but opted to play for Wales, where he had lived for three years, because he felt his rugby career had been rejuvenated on the western side of the Severn Bridge. The same could be said for Ben Morgan, who came to the attention of England and Wales selectors when he hit a rich vein of form for the Scarlets, but the pull of wearing the rose was too great for the No 8. Rugby’s eligibility regulations have become a farce, with players able to chop and change their allegiance with ease. Rugby World looks at how to solve the problemslast_img read more

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The greatest centres of all time: Danie Gerber

first_img Major teams: Eastern Province, Western Province Position: CentreCountry: South AfricaTest span: 1980-92Test caps: 24 (24 starts)Test points: 82 (19T, 1C)From Eastern Province, Gerber emerged on the international scene in 1980, just missing that year’s tour of South Africa by Bill Beaumont’s Lions, and set about carving up opponents left, right and centre up until 1992.Tragically, in sporting terms, he only won 24 caps – scoring 19 tries – when in any other era since he would have been close to three figures or beyond and setting almost unreachable scoring marks.His most famous demolition job came in 1984 when he put England to the sword, scoring a try in the 33-15 win in Port Elizabeth and a hat-trick in the second Test in Johannesburg when the Springboks ran out 35-9 winners. Danie Gerber is often referred to as one of the greatest centres to play the game. It was South Africa’s spell in the sporting wilderness, that prevented him from being a household name TAGS: The Greatest Players Gerber had power, good feet and acceleration and according to his team-mate Ray Mordt was “the most dangerous player in the world from broken play”. It was no wonder then that rugby league clubs in Britain were queueing up to sign the midfielder, but Gerber stayed as an amateur in union whilst Mordt and Rob Louw made the trek to Wigan. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS South Africa’s Danie Gerber When South Africa was reinstated into international rugby in 1992, Gerber, by now 34, scored two tries against the All Blacks in the Springboks’ first Test back in Johannesburg but he retired from international rugby following the defeat to England later that year.His career had contained Tests against sides such as the 1986 New Zealand Cavaliers and appearances against cobbled-together World XVs that did scant justice to his talents. Unsurprisingly, he was inducted into the International Rugby Hall of Fame – a small consolation for not being able to display his skills on a wider stage when he was in his prime. It was rugby’s loss.last_img read more

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Rugby’s Greatest: Victor Matfield

first_img Expand Rugby’s Greatest: Martin Johnson John Eales’s influence on rugby was so profound… TAGS: The Greatest Players Major teams: Blue Bulls, Griquas, Cats, Toulon, NorthamptonCountry: South Africa
Test span: 2001-2015South Africa caps: 127 (121 starts)Test points: 35 (7T) Rugby’s Greatest: Victor MatfieldNot even retirement halted Victor Matfield’s influence on the international stage. Two-and-a-half years after bowing out of rugby when the Springboks were dumped out of the 2011 World Cup by Australia, the shaggy-haired lock ended his hiatus and returned to Super Rugby action with the Blue Bulls, for whom he had been serving as a lineout coach.That June, Matfield captained South Africa to a 47-13 defeat of a World XV in Cape Town at the age of 37 and promptly added to his tally of 110 caps in the ensuing two-match series against Wales.Four months later, he played all 80 minutes of an epic 27-25 victory over New Zealand at Ellis Park. It was the All Blacks’ maiden loss in 22 outings and provided indisputable evidence that Matfield could still mix it with the best on the planet.Though the Bulls endured a torrid Super Rugby campaign in 2015, Matfield was included in Heyneke Meyer’s squad for the Rugby Championship, and went to a fourth World Cup with the Bok’s.In truth, his status as a South Africa great was secure before the end of the last decade. Matfield’s mathematical set-piece prowess in a complementary engine-room partnership with bruising Bakkies Botha was a mainstay of the 2007 World Cup success and 2009 series defeat of the Lions. Collapse Expand South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby’s Greatest: John Ealescenter_img South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Four years on from their shock loss to… Though a yellow card meant he wasn’t on the field for the final whistle, he also captained the Springboks to a 30-28 defeat of New Zealand in 2008, ending the All Blacks’ five-year unbeaten home record.There were also three Super Rugby titles in four seasons between 2007 and 2010 with the Bulls in a period drenched with silverware on all fronts.Ahead of the clash with Ireland last November, Matfield named Lions adversary Paul O’Connell as his most respected opponent. The mighty Munsterman wasted no time in returning the compliment.“He’s the best lineout forward in the world and has been for a long time. To be able to take two years out and come back as good, if not better, than he ever was is an incredible achievement.” Rugby’s Greatest: John Eales Rugby’s Greatest: Martin Johnson One of the greatest second-rows to play the… Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Hotshot: Glasgow scrum-half Jamie Dobie

first_img Glasgow scrum-half Jamie DobieDate of birth 7 June 2001 Born Inverness Club Glasgow Position Scrum-half Country ScotlandWhat sports did you play growing up? A lot of tennis, a lot of golf, obviously rugby. I did a spot of everything really.When did you start playing rugby?At the age of nine in primary school in Inverness, but tennis was my main thing. I was in the tennis academy when I first went to Merchiston school and started playing rugby at the same time. At 14/15, with exams, it was too much to do both.I stuck with rugby because I enjoyed it more – playing with team-mates and friends rather than being an individual in tennis. That’s when rugby took over.What positions have you played? A bit at fly-half in my last year at school but that was more experimental; I’ve really always been a scrum-half. I think skills I picked up playing tennis and golf helped – hand-eye coordination and footwork.What are your strengths? I think passing is probably a strength and my running game has definitely come on. I’ve also done a lot of work on defence.Any childhood heroes?  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Livewire: Jamie Dobie breaks for Glasgow Warriors (Inpho) This article originally appeared in the November 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img Playing tennis, Andy Murray was the obvious one being a Scot and at the top of the game.Who’s been the biggest influence on your career? My school coach Roddy Deans. He coached me in the last couple of years there. There was influence on the pitch and influence off the pitch, with the leadership element and mental side of the game. He was a massive influence on me and I’m in the position I am now because of him.When did you link up with Glasgow? I was in Edinburgh’s academy for my last couple of years at school and I moved to Glasgow on a pro contract straight from school at 18.What are your goals going forward?To just keep broadening my game and skill-set. I’ve had this first year to learn the structure at Glasgow and role of scrum-half. It’s taking opportunities when they come.What do you do away from rugby? I’m about to start a business course at Strathclyde University in Glasgow.RW Verdict: The World Cup meant Dobie enjoyed more game time than he expected on arriving at Scotstoun and he was named Young Player of the Year in May. He can expect to build on that over the coming months, with his sharp breaks testing defences. The No 9 joined the Warriors straight from school and made an immediate impactlast_img read more

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BRAZIL: An invitation to build an Anglican Space in the…

first_imgBRAZIL: An invitation to build an Anglican Space in the City of God By ACNS staffPosted Dec 12, 2011 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans and Episcopalians everywhere are being invited to join Priest/Missioner Nicholas Wheeler and members of the Parish of Christ the King in creating an Anglican Space in Brazil’s notorious City of God.In 2003, after watching the shocking and disturbing film City of God about life in the slums of Rio de Janiero, English priest Wheeler felt called to move there. Ten years later, the parish is not only planning to help the community celebrate how life as improved there, but is also looking to provide much-needed community center, The Anglican Space.“With the occupation of the neighborhood by the police, state and municipal government are beginning to take a whole range of initiatives,” said Wheeler, “but they seem reluctant to invest in existing institutions or infrastructure that would enable the vibrant life that already flourishes in the City of God to grow even further.“We believe that the Anglican Church’s vocation is Cidade de Deus is to extend to the local community the unconditional love and generous hospitality of God made known in the life of Jesus Christ. Like St Augustine, who theological masterpiece ‘City of God’ summons Christians to work for the peace of the earthly city whilst on their journey to the heavenly one, the Parish of Christ the King aims to make this vision concrete through the provision of community meeting space.”The church already plays host to a range of social projects including Narcotics Anonymous, training courses in subjects such as hairdressing and cookery, psychotherapy provision, and free music lessons to 200 local children. The new Anglican Space will provide a community hall featuring a permanent exhibition of the story of Cidade de Deus and the Anglican Church’s presence in the neighborhood.There will be eight meeting rooms and a kitchen. A small oratory and a planted courtyard will provide retreat spaces for users. Modest accommodation for clergy or theological students on placement and the site manager will also be included. There will be baby changing facilities and the building will be fully accessible for people with special needs.Speaking at last week’s launch of the fundraising campaign launch in the Wren Suite in the Crypt of England’s St. Paul’s Cathedral, Wheeler said, “As Cidade de Deus begins a significant new chapter in its story we believe that we are called to be a part of the river of living water bringing renewal to our community.”The launch of the campaign, which aims to raise £125,000 ($260,000) by June 2012, was attended by a range of supporters including the Rt. Rev. David Hamid, suffragan bishop of the Diocese in Europe and appeal patron, who spoke with enthusiasm about the work of in the Parish of Christ the King, both past and future.“I can see from what has been presented today that Fr. Nicholas and his community have a fresh vision for the next chapter of what I think is heroic work of the Anglican Church in Rio de Janeiro,” said Hamid, adding that the project is “very deserving of our support.”This article first appeared on the Anglican Communion News Service here. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

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Video: Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas on the enthronement

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Archbishop of Canterbury, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Justin Welby Enthronement, Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Video: Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas on the enthronement Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] Bishop Ian Douglas of the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut reflects on the enthronement of the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 21, 2013 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Video Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Presiding Bishop updates staff on independent investigation

first_img April 4, 2016 at 6:50 pm Stay the course Bp Curry and the blessings of God will always be with you. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Rev. Canon Ian Elliott Davies says: Presiding Bishop updates staff on independent investigation April 6, 2016 at 9:54 pm I give thanks for Your Grace’s leadership and commitment. We will continue to pray for your work and trust in bringing the love of Christ to a fractured world. Rector Tampa, FL Tags Victoria T. Hatch(The Rev’d Canon) says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel April 4, 2016 at 10:02 pm It is a good feeling to have a national church that is willing to stand up and walk the walk. The church as a whole needs to know that going to the leadership of the church will mean something will happen. I will pray for other people who have to relearn how to interact with each other. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. April 4, 2016 at 7:02 pm I certainly wouldn’t hold Chicago up as a model for how things ought to work. It’s been a mess for the past several years. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (9) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Christina Thom says: April 4, 2016 at 6:48 pm …the reason for their termination? …the paraphrase re Syngistics? “… They have done great work helping the Diocese of Chicago and many other organizations understand their culture and move quickly into healthier cultural patterns…” This scared me…the Chicago Diocese (some have said Bishop Lee) has voted people out of their church, with no reason given. At age 65, looking back 40 years I recall my very good friend Canon Henri Stines, Trinity Church, telling me, “…Chicago only has one agenda…and stay away from the Diocesan center…” Guess the agenda? Submit a Job Listing April 5, 2016 at 1:21 am Thank you, Michael, for clearing the air and breathing in the Spirit, We look forward to moving forward with you and all our brothers and sisters in the Jesus Movement. April 7, 2016 at 1:14 pm Thank you Most Reverend Curry, for seeing where most would not look, for acting when many would avoid a decision, and for your care and wisdom throughout. Your leadership is a model for us all. My prayer is for the healing you have invoked. Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Posted Apr 4, 2016 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS susan zimmerman says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 5, 2016 at 7:52 pm thank you Levi [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry today addressed the staff of The Episcopal Church and provided the following update about the independent investigation he called for after placing three members of senior management on administrative leave in December.As you know on December 9, 2015 I placed Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer, Mr. Sam McDonald, Deputy Chief Operating Officer and Director of Mission, and Mr. Alex Baumgarten, Director of Public Engagement and Mission Communications, on Administrative Leave pending an investigation into formal complaints and allegations of potential violations of personnel policies of the DFMS, received from multiple members of the staff of the Presiding Bishop.At my request, the firm of Curley, Hessinger & Johnsrud conducted an independent investigation into these complaints and allegations. In calling for an independent, external investigation, I presumed neither guilt nor innocence, but committed only to a search for the truth. That search for the truth required a thorough and comprehensive investigation. The investigators met with or had phone conversations with over 40 different persons, including the three individuals named in the complaints, and reviewed thousands of pages of documents. The Episcopal Church offered no constraints nor influence on the investigation, and the confidences shared with the in-dependent investigators have been safeguarded.The actions that I am taking are based on the facts determined and findings reached by that independent investigation.Findings and ActionOur task as staff is to serve The Episcopal Church in such a way that it can serve the world in the Name and in the Spirit of Jesus Christ. We are therefore all called to strive for and adhere to the highest standards of personal and professional conduct embodying the love of God and reflecting the teachings and the way of Jesus.I am saddened that the investigation has concluded that two staff members violated these standards. Specifically, Sam McDonald and Alex Baumgarten were found to have violated established workplace policies and to have failed to live up to the Church’s standards of personal conduct in their relationships with employees, which contributed to a workplace environment often inconsistent with the values and expectations of The Episcopal Church. Both are therefore immediately terminated.The investigation concluded that Bishop Stacy Sauls did not violate workplace policy, was unaware of the policy violations of the two staff members reporting to him, and operated within the scope of his office. No further investigation is warranted. Nevertheless, given the needs for staff leadership in light of my priorities for the direction of the Church, Bishop Sauls will not continue as Chief Operating Officer of the DFMS. Conversations are underway to implement this decision.Going ForwardWith the independent investigation behind us, I want to say something about how we will go forward from here.We have healing to do. Trust must be rebuilt. Unhelpful patterns of behavior need to be replaced with new ways of working together. This will not happen overnight. Nonetheless, it will be rewarding. We will all need to be open to feedback – myself included. We will all need to imagine a better working environment and be willing to change to make things better.a. HR audit and procedural review of all safeguards systemsGoing forward, I am committed to ensuring that concerns about workplace misconduct and other kinds of complaints or conflicts are addressed effectively, early, efficiently and on the lowest level possible. To that end, I am in the process of engaging an expert in this field to conduct an independent Human Resources audit and procedural review of all of our workplace system safeguards and functions, with a particular attention to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace environment for all. At the conclusion of this audit and review, we will conduct substantive retraining for the entire Episcopal Church staff.We have been and will continue to pray for all those impacted by this situation, and we are providing or will provide direct pastoral support to those individuals who desire it.b. Work toward a healthy cultureIt is clear to me that the real and more important work we must do together going forward is not primarily organizational and structural, but deeply cultural and spiritual. Toward that end we have retained a firm named Human Synergistics. They come highly recommended by people whose wisdom and judgment I have great confidence in, and they bring extensive experience and the capacity to help us address concerns about the culture of the staff and our system that have now come to the fore in part because of this situation. They have done great work helping the Diocese of Chicago and many other organizations understand their culture and move quickly into healthier cultural patterns. In the near future, every member of staff will be asked to participate in a series of surveys about the culture we have now and how, together, we can move it in a healthier direction. I ask for your courage as we do this. We will need to work together to recognize and change old patterns of behavior which are not helpful, to imagine new possibilities for our work environment, and ultimately to claim the high calling of serving God by serving the people of God known as The Episcopal Church in the work of serving and witnessing to the way of Jesus of Nazareth which is the way of the very love of God.c. Operations in the meantimeIn practical terms, we will continue in the structure we have used since early December as we adapt into ever more effective structures to meet the needs of the church in the future.The leadership team will continue to include myself, Chief Financial Officer Kurt Barnes, and Canons Charles “Chuck” Robertson, Michael Hunn and Stephanie Spellers. We will be working with you on creating a responsive and collaborative leadership environment. We will give you more information about what will happen with the canonically described COO position in due course.The Mission Department team leaders will continue to meet weekly with the Canons to coordinate the ministry of that department. I will join those meetings every 4 to 6 weeks so I can be more closely connected to those ministries.Canon Robertson, with the help of the Reverend Mark Stevenson, will continue to guide the Office of Government Relations and its work of public policy advocacy for a more just and humane national and global community. We will be working on determining the shape of leadership needed for the long term.Canon Hunn will continue to guide the Communications Department while we reimagine how the communications department can help the church do evangelism by telling the good news through every medium from Twitter to print to YouTube. Ultimately we will hire a new Director of Communications once we determine the kind of person we need to lead us into the future.Canon Spellers will continue to guide and partner with leaders on Evangelism, Reconciliation, Church Planting, and Ethnic Ministries. We will work together to reimagine how that work is best structured and how evangelism and communications are seamlessly connected.ConclusionIn spite of the stress and difficulty of the last few months you have continued to do our work faithfully. I am so deeply thankful for that and honored and blessed to serve our Lord with you.Our task as staff is to serve The Episcopal Church in such a way that it can serve the world in the Name and in the Spirit of Jesus Christ. Our commitment to taking our place as part of the Jesus Movement in the world, our commitment to the work of evangelism, our commitment to the work of racial reconciliation is directly tied to this. And I am unswerving in my commitment to that.While I did not anticipate this situation as the first major challenge of my tenure as Presiding Bishop, I am likewise unswerving in my commitment to each of you that we will work together to have a workplace that reflects the love of God and the teachings of Jesus. We will work together to have a workplace that really does look something like the dream that God intends for us all and the whole world.God love you. God bless you.+MichaelThe Most Rev. Michael CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal Church The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Walter Bryan says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ April 4, 2016 at 4:58 pm Thank you Bp Curry for your leadership in this difficult process. Vicki Gray says: Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Julie Dean Larsen says: Rector Bath, NC susan zimmerman says: Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Levi Harris says: Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury visits Holocaust museum with chief rabbi after…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted May 4, 2017 Archbishop of Canterbury visits Holocaust museum with chief rabbi after praying at Western Wall [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis have visited Israel’s Holocaust memorial, Yad Vashem, to remember and lament the tragedy of the Holocaust and the implications and effects it has subsequently had on so many lives. Earlier they prayed for peace at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.Speaking at Yad Vashem, the archbishop acknowledged the history of anti-Semitism in the Anglican Church and restated his commitment to continue efforts to stop anti-Semitism.Full article. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Comments (1) Tony Oberdorfer says: May 5, 2017 at 10:31 am Archbishop Welby’s suggestion that “within European culture the root of all racism is found in anti-Semitism” is naïve and pernicious. To locate yet another Holocaust “learning centre” next door to the Houses of Parliament will accomplish nothing except to inspire additional feelings of anti-semitism among those who without in any way being “Holocaust deniers” believe that there are indeed other things in today’s world that matter. Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Middle East Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Comments are closed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Canterbury, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Israel-Palestine, Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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