January 2021

Students to rally for peace in Sudan

first_img The rally will include remarks from professional basketball players Ed Bona and Luol Deng, Notre Dame men’s basketball coach Mike Brey, Notre Dame men’s lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan, and a video message from a Notre Dame graduate student from Sudan. Hesburgh visited Sudan more than 15 years ago and remembers driving deep into the country during his trip. Notre Dame students will unite on campus for peace in Sudan on Saturday during a rally that will feature University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh following the Playing for Peace 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The 3-on-3 basketball tournament — sponsored by the men’s basketball team, men’s lacrosse team and student government — will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday in the Joyce Center, and the “Stand with Sudan” peace rally will begin at 12 p.m. in the Joyce Center Fieldhouse. “While student activism is a great part of this, the focus now needs to be on the events unfolding in Sudan and how our voices can contribute to the call for a peaceful and just solution to the problems that may arise with the expiration of the peace accord there,” Corrigan said. “We deeply believe that as the greatest Catholic university in the world we have not only the ability but the responsibility to harness all the means at our disposal, but particularly the Notre Dame athletic brand, for social change,” McCormick said. “We just want to see a sense of urgency. This peace accord is going to expire in January, and we will ask if we let apathy overwhelm us when we have the opportunity to do something,” Dugan said. “All these different groups are coming together for what is unquestionably the most pressing social concerns need of the Church in this year.” On Oct. 5, a delegation from the Sudanese Conference of Catholic bishops visited campus to ask Notre Dame. as a Catholic university. to raise awareness about potential for mass violence in Sudan. “I got a feeling for the place, and it is like most of Africa. Every country in Africa seems to have a problem,” Hesburgh said. “[Sudan’s] problem is are they going to join north or south, or are they going to develop separately … The conflict always boils down to the same thing, and that is access to resources.” “Think of two people in Sudan, the north and the south. Both of those really want peace. Peace is the overarching concern of everybody in Africa today because there has been so much unrest and so much war,” Hesburgh said. “I think it is high time we started working very hard for peace throughout the continent, and I think it is possible.” Shortly after the bishops’ visit, Notre Dame’s Student Senate unanimously passed a resolution pledging support for the people of Sudan. The Student Senate also sponsored an online petition to be sent to President Obama closer to the referendum. “[The bishops’] appeal was to the Catholic community and asked Catholics in the United States to remember the referendum and do whatever we can to call for international attention to Sudan,” McCormick said. “From the student government perspective and from the athletic perspective, we really only think this could have been possible because of the strength of the student body and the level of engagement of our students,” McCormick said.center_img Men’s lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan said he was excited to see the collaboration between the department of athletics and the student body on an issue of international importance. The peace agreement called for six years of democratic reforms and national elections leading up to the referendum. The vote was intended to be a peaceful process, but both sides began to stockpile weapons as the referendum approached. The petition asked policy makers to make preventing violence in Sudan a priority as January draws closer, McCormick said. Director of men’s lacrosse operations Kevin Dugan said the basketball and lacrosse teams got involved because they wanted to do more for campus than ask students to show up at games. “The two most powerful things at Notre Dame, the two things people are most passionate about, are athletics and Catholic social thought,” Dugan said. “When you bring the two of those things together, you can capture the spirit of Notre Dame in a special way.” “What is so exciting about the petition is that it gives students the opportunity to lead, to show that they understand the moral dimensions of this issue and to call the world’s attention to it,” McCormick said. The northern and southern parts of Sudan have been torn by civil war for more than 50 years. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) formally ended civil war in 2005 and scheduled a referendum for Jan. 9, 2011. The Sudanese will then vote on whether Southern Sudan will secede. Social concerns chair Pat McCormick said the rally will combine the visibility of Notre Dame athletics with the University’s moral concern for social justice. The department of athletics harnessed the Notre Dame brand to advertise the event. The Playing for Peace logo, a peace sign embedded in a shamrock, appeared on 2,000 t-shirts to be sold for $5 on Saturday and 2,000 buttons to be distributed for free, Dugan said. Hesburgh said averting this conflict would pave the way for development in Sudan. “Economic development will make good education a top priority, and with good education will come good jobs, and with good jobs will come good salaries,” Hesburgh said. “That is the only way we are going to get equality, by equality of opportunity.”last_img read more

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ND hosts regional debate

first_imgNotre Dame will host the first regional tournament in the Ronald Reagan Great Communicator Debate Series on Saturday. The debate series, sponsored by The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, will feature high school students from across the nation. Students who make the championship tournament will compete at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California, and the winner will receive scholarship awards, according to the foundation website. Dr. Susan Ohmer, academic advisor to the Notre Dame debate team and film, television and theatre (FTT) professor, and Yvonne Waggoner, site coordinator, have been working since May to organize the tournament. “When you put together a tournament, you [have to] think of things like where’s it going to be, how many rooms do we need, all the supplies and equipment,” Ohmer said. Notre Dame was selected to host a regional tournament  because of historic ties between Reagan and Notre Dame, she said. “[The connection] goes back to when President Reagan played the role of the Gipper in “Knute Rockne All-American,” Ohmer said. “And also, [Notre Dame] awarded him an honorary degree. So when [The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation] thought of schools in the Midwest, we came to mind.” This series of debates is based off the format of presidential debates, assuming there is no expertise in debate, Ohmer said. “[The students] don’t have to know special techniques, special terminology; it’s intended to encourage people to speak persuasively and logically on a situation,” she said. Ohmer said to make the debates even more like those during a presidential election, the Reagan Foundation built in specific elements to make the debates more realistic. There will be four preliminary rounds and two elimination rounds throughout the competition and the final debate round will be at 6 p.m. in Washington Hall. Debaters will be scored on their opening statement, rebuttal, response to questions, as well as their closing statement, Ohmer said. “The Reagan Foundation built in some characteristics for it to be more like presidential debates so that in the middle of the debate, the moderator is allowed to ask a question of either side,” Ohmer said. “And that’s straight from the presidential debates.” The most important thing to know about this debate is that you [the students] are asked to present your case to an interested, educated audience, who are not specialists in debate, so it’s called public forum debate.” The judges for the competition are members of the debate team, debate team coaches, students in the Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars Program, as well as students in Ohmer’s class, “Media and the Presidency.” The final debate round in the evening has three judges: Mike Schmuhl, the chief of staff to South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Gary Sieber, who teaches in FTT and works for WNDU television station, and Professor Jay Tidmarsh of the Law School, she said.   Students participating in the event will also be able to get a feel for the campus by eating in South Dining Hall and listening to a presentation from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. “We felt strongly that we wanted the students to be welcomed to campus,” Ohmer said. Contact Catherine Owers at [email protected]last_img read more

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Mendoza expands program eligibility

first_imgThe applicant pool is open – individuals who attained undergraduate degrees with non-business majors are now invited to apply to the One-Year Masters of Business (MBA) Program within the Mendoza College of Business.  Brian Lohr, director of MBA and Masters of Science and Business (MSB) Admissions, said the changed policy recognizes the achievements of individuals who honed business expertise in the workplace. He said applicants are welcome to apply to the program if they can demonstrate “significant knowledge of fundamental business concepts.”  “The change in requirement takes into consideration more recent trends in the education and employment landscape by recognizing that candidates often have developed considerable knowledge about business through a meaningful work experience after graduation,” Lohr said. “They may have landed in a role that required them to manage budgets, manage projects or supervise others and they gained a lot of on-the-job training in essential business operations.” Lohr said this policy revision was a joint effort between several Mendoza representatives, including both Lohr and Dean Roger Huang. The group changed the policy in order to facilitate the addition of diverse perspectives to the One-Year MBA Program, though the requirements for admission have not changed, Lohr said. “We look for three primary items when we evaluate candidates: academic excellence, leadership and a consideration for others,” Lohr said. “These three components have not changed, this just allows us to look at a little bit of a broader pool.” According to the program’s website, its requirements are, “an undergraduate degree from an accredited university where English is the primary language, a demonstrated proficiency in fundamental business knowledge and skills usually gained through significant work experience, three credit hours of financial accounting and three credit hours of statistics.”  His own experience working in a field he did not study as an undergraduate pushes him to advocate for the extension of eligibility for Mendoza’s programs to prospective students who did not study business during their undergraduate careers, he said. “I am one of those folks,” Lohr said. “I was an English major as an undergraduate but I worked for Lockheed right when I got out of school. About a week after I was hired, I went to my boss and asked him why he hired me, since I didn’t have an engineering or business degree.” He said he felt this experience showed him how when people with distinct backgrounds work collectively to solve a problem, a more innovative solution can be reached.  “I think that’s what makes the classroom environment so different at Notre Dame, those backgrounds allow you to look at problems from different perspectives. I think that is a really good thing that we have going on in Mendoza: about a third of my two-year class is from business, about a third is from math, science or engineering and a third is from humanities. “The diversity makes for interesting discussions and allows students to look back on their experiences to attack a problem from a different angle,” Lohr said. “This [type of education] is unique and fostered here.” Lohr said he expects the extension of eligibility to graduates with non-business majors to increase the quality of Mendoza’s One-Year MBA Program.  “I’m not sure how this will impact the applicant pool, though I feel strongly that it will grow significantly because of that change,” Lohr said. “That just makes sense for Notre Dame, to [work to] attract the best and brightest candidates … to hinder that with stringent prerequisites didn’t make a whole lot of sense. “Our ability to bring in the best and brightest MBA candidates in the world is critical to our continued success.” Lohr said the program has continued to climb Businessweek’s rankings since its inception, and he hopes this change will facilitate the rise of Mendoza’s program. “In 1997 we were not ranked within the top 50 MBA programs and now we’re a part of the top 20 programs based on Businessweek’s last survey,” he said. “We’re excited about what the future holds.” Contact Nicole Michels at [email protected]last_img read more

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Alumna named Mitchell Scholar

first_imgOn Nov. 25, The U.S.-Ireland Alliance announced a 2008 Notre Dame alumnus is one of this year’s Mitchell Scholars and will receive a full scholarship to a one-year Master’s program in Ireland.  Molly Hayes, a Kenya desk officer at the U.S. Department of State who graduated from Notre Dame with degrees in English and Arabic, was one of 12 people selected from a pool of 300 applicants.  According to her biography on the Mitchell Scholars website, Hayes has worked as desk officer for multiple North African nations, and she was a deputy coordinator for the Egypt Task Force during the Arab Spring.  During Hayes’s time at Notre Dame, the biography said, she founded ND-Abroad, which worked to help students studying abroad and “developed a University Counseling Center support group for students who experienced trauma abroad.”  Hayes plans to study postcolonial and world literature at National University of Ireland, Maynooth, according to the biography. Dr. Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of National Fellowships at the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said the award, which is on par with the Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships, will bring prestige to the University.  “These are the kinds of things that raise the academic profile of an institution and really enhance Notre Dame’s reputation as a world-class research institution, and really is providing a world-class undergraduate education,” Thibert said. “I think, especially in Molly’s case, it’s a testament to the kind of … education she received here that helped her to achieve such great things in the past four to five years since she left.”  Thibert said the award also raises the profile of CUSE, through which Hayes did research when she was an undergraduate.  “There are a lot of opportunities here, in part through CUSE, but also through other groups on campus to receive funding for undergraduate projects, undergraduate research of all different kinds,” he said. “I’ve been at a few other institutions, and I’m amazed at how much support there is for that here, so I would really encourage people to take advantage of that. “[Doing research through CUSE] contributed, in a sense, to her winning this award, but it also contributed to her being able to get into the kinds of positions she got into with the State Department. And I think that made a really big difference in her application to have these kinds of experiences, which she might not have been able to have if she had not had the opportunities she had here.”  Thibert said while some scholarship applications require University endorsements, the Mitchell Scholars Program does not. He said his office worked with her on other aspects of the application.  “We mostly worked on interviewing advice,” Thibert said. “We have sort of a database of information from past years because we’ve had people interviewing for these things and there’s also a fellowship adviser organization that collects information on these things. We were giving her some advice on what to expect from the semifinalist interview and then from the finalist interview.”  Thibert said he also hopes the fact that Hayes won the scholarship will raise awareness of the opportunities Notre Dame alumni have, even after they graduate.  “We’re trying to do more to reach out to these alumni to get the word out about some of these awards, because sometimes people think when they graduate, that’s kind of it,” he said. “Even if they know they’re eligible for certain things, they don’t realize they can still work with us, but they can. As long as someone graduated from here, we are happy to work with him [or her].”  Contact Emily McConville at [email protected]last_img read more

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SMC seniors reflect on art comprehensive projects

first_imgTags: liz mcbride, senior art comprehensives Saint Mary’s recently exhibited the senior comprehensive projects of senior art majors Emily Engler, Colleen Donohue, Malea Schulte and Elizabeth McBride in Moreau Center for the Arts gallery.The four students’ work was part of the senior exhibitions that occur each spring semester. Student artwork is presented and evaluated by a panel of staff members in the art department, McBride said. Other students have a chance to witness the work as well, both as members of various art classes where they evaluate the work, and by simply walking through the galleries.McBride is a senior art history major, a specified division of the art department. Along with an exhibit showcased in the gallery, art history majors have to write a paper or analysis on a subject. As an artist as well as a musician, McBride said her paper took an interesting turn.“My topic was a visual culture analysis on videosongs,” McBride said. “These are videosongs of artists recording and illustrating their songs. In a way, it’s a subculture and its own genre of music. Since there is a visual element, I was able to analyze is for my art history comprehensive.”For the exhibition part of her comprehensive project, McBride displayed a visual reference of videosong artists executing their work. Even though this was smaller in size compared to other projects, she said that she still took a pride in her work and was proud of how far she had come.“I just sort of put it up without any explanation, but I won’t lie, I stopped and looked almost every time I passed by it. It was for posterity,” McBride said.Though having an exhibit in a gallery and an extensive paper may seem daunting, McBride said she learned many valuable lessons in the process.“My number one piece of advice to any student: work hard,” McBride said. “It isn’t simple, because there is a lot involved. You can work hard to get something done at the last minute, but you’re mostly getting that thing done … because it’s last minute. Working hard is a process that involves consistency and effort.”McBride said for underclassmen, this is a good technique to begin brainstorming ideas for senior comprehensive projects.“[This way,] by the time the capstone or theses projects rolls around, you’ll know essentially what to expect. You can’t avoid or escape the stress, but you’ll know what to expect since you know what you have to do and how to do it,” McBride said.Another rewarding part of these final projects comes in the form of knowing that there are people alongside you for the ride, she said.“I take so much pride in being able to call the other art majors my friends,” McBride said. “We were a support system in every way, and I can’t thank them enough for being there to hear me spiel about videosongs, other stressors and my general random commentaries.“I think that closeness helped each of us create extraordinary work. A good relationship brings the best out of people and that’s exactly what happened. [I have] too much gratitude, and I feel I can’t explain enough in words. Thank you, thank you, thank you.”last_img read more

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Film explores lasting implications of Roe v. Wade

first_imgSaint Mary’s Campus Ministry and Belles For Life sponsored a screening of the film “40” in conjunction with a discussion with John Morales, director of the film and founder of Pro-Life Champions, and Linda Couri, a former Planned Parenthood counselor and the current director of the Institute for Lay Formation with the Archdiocese of Chicago. The film focused on the 40 years since Roe v. Wade legalized abortion and features women from both the pro-life and pro-choice movement.Morales said he was not always at the forefront of the pro-life movement — he found his passion for the movement when he and his wife could not conceive and eventually adopted their son.“I’m very passionate about this issue because I believe that the issue of abortion is not merely a religious issue or a political issue,” he said. “It’s not just a Catholic issue or an Evangelical or a Protestant issue. It’s not a Democratic issue or a Republican issue. I believe that the issue of life is the most important human and civil rights issue of our time because without the right to life, there are no other rights to talk about.”Couri said the two central features of her pro-life position are her past work with Planned Parenthood and the fact that she herself has had an abortion.“These features of my life have contributed significantly to my thoughts on abortion,” Couri said. “I have come to the conclusion that in the long run, abortion is not the solution to truly help and protect women.”According to Couri, the issue of abortion “is tearing women apart from women.”“Women need women. We need to get together. Women need to save the world,” she said. “We’re just not talking. The woman-to-woman fight has become to extreme and so ugly that all of the gifts that women bring to the table in terms of communication and problem solving have been lost.”Sophomore Roni Hanks said her concern is the potential danger that making abortion illegal poses. Making abortion illegal will not stop women from having abortions, but instead would increase the number of women who die from unsafe and illegal abortions, she said.“According to my textbooks, over three-fourths of women who are considering abortion say that they would still go through with it even if it wasn’t safe or legal,” Hanks said. “I think pro-choicers and pro-lifers alike can agree that the needs of women in our society are not met.”Couri said her concern lies with the fact that the law has moral authority. Though she said if she could instantly make abortion illegal, she would do it, she also recognizes that the pro-life movement needs to consider what they will do if abortion does become illegal.“I very much care about this country,” Couri said. “It makes me nervous that there is a law that says it’s okay to kill people. There is a moral authority that comes forth from law.”Since Roe v. Wade made abortion legal in 1973, the sexual culture changed drastically, Couri said. Premarital sex became more popular and abortion became the easy solution for unwanted pregnancy, she said.“What I want to know is why women sleep with and have sex with men and give it away so often,” Couri said. “I’m very concerned with how much women can engage in sexual activity with people who are not willing to be fathers. … Never in the course of history could women control their fertility, which really kept social mores kind of at bay. All of a sudden, men now have access to the one thing they want the most.“The problem is, women have lost their power in a lot of ways because one power we do have is sexual power. … I think prevention of unwanted pregnancy has to begin with who are women choosing to sleep with.”The blame for unwanted pregnancy should not be placed solely on the woman, senior Vanessa Troglia said.“My problem is it puts virginity or abstinence in a box,” Troglia said. “It makes it a woman’s responsibility and not a human responsibility. … If we’re really talking in feminist terms, it should be ‘nobody should be giving it away.’ My problem is the responsibility is put solely on women instead of putting it on both partners equally, which is a sad reality.”Tags: Abortion, Pro-choice, Pro-lifelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students start ‘Like a Belle’ anti-bullying campaign

first_imgIn an effort to combat bullying, Saint Mary’s Justice Student Advisory Committee has introduced the hashtag #LikeaBelle to be used on social media in order to promote inclusivity on campus. Students discussed the social media campaign during a panel on bullying on campus that was held during the second day of the College’s Diverse Student Leadership Conference.Junior Morgan Matthews said the movement started as a response to incidences of bullying that occurred within the freshman class before the school year had even begun.“There was a lot of just bullying, whether it be from person to person, or lying or from text, and it really started progressing into [other] classes,” Matthews said. “So we really wanted to fight this from the inside out — we wanted to promote diversity among the Belles.”The campaign is aimed at demonstrating that there is no one way to be a Belle, Matthews said.“What our #LikeaBelle campaign is really trying to promote is how a Saint Mary’s Belle isn’t a one kind of person,” she said. “It has the whole spectrum of who you are as an individual.”Senior Caylin McCallick said the hashtag was made for everyday use for students on social media.“My vision for this was someone posting a status like, ‘On my way to a meeting, just took an exam, going to study later #LikeaBelle,’” she said.The group is making three-minute videos — that are posted to their Facebook page — of interviews with students about what they like about the College, Matthews said. The videos are published every two weeks, she said.“What we want to gain from this is inclusivity,” Matthews said.Matthews said the group has seven videos made with students with different aspects of the college.“They showcase different groups of Belles,” Matthews said.McCallick said they would like to reach out to local schools about combating bullying.“We decided that would be best played out if we did assemblies at local schools to promote anti-bullying in their environments, as well,” McCallick said.Matthews said that teaching the local students about bullying will help the students in the future.“It really makes a difference when you get older,” Matthews said.Junior Alex Shambery said the campaign is also aimed at showing non-students the diversity and inclusiveness of the campus, as well.“We’re just hoping to get the word out about how diverse our campus is and how loving we are of one another,” Shamberry said. “It’s really just showing support for other students and showing other students that we are a very inclusive and a very loving community.”McCallick said that the group knows that not all students have the same experience at Saint Mary’s, but should feel welcome.“Not everyone’s Saint Mary’s experience is going to be the same and we know that,” McCallick said. “Not everyone is going to have the typical Saint Mary’s sisterhood feeling and that’s okay if you’re not experiencing that; then we want to help you find somewhere that you feel comfortable on this campus.”McCallick said that the campus was not prepared for the bullying to happen, but they can now handle this problem with inclusion.“It’s unfortunate that this year when we have an amazingly diverse freshmen class … we weren’t prepared to help meet the needs of that class to make sure they transitioned well,” McCallick said. “But we can do it now.”Shambery said the next freshmen class should watch the videos before they come to campus.“I think it’s a very good idea to get to them before they settle in,” Shambery said.Tags: #LikeaBelle, bullying, DSLC, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Jenkins signs letter to President Trump regarding climate change

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins signed a letter to President Donald Trump and members of the U.S. Congress addressing the issue of climate change, the University announced Thursday via a Catholic Climate Covenant press release.The letter, which was signed by the leaders of more than 150 Catholic organizations, urged Trump to “reassert U.S. leadership in the global effort to address climate change,” an issue that has gained prominence in the Catholic Church.“Catholic leaders across the nation and world have explicitly and consistently affirmed climate change as a moral issue that threatens core Catholic commitments,” the letter said.Signees asked Trump to fund the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “meaningfully participate” in UNFCCC business and respect the existing U.S. commitments to the Green Climate Fund.Tags: Fr. John Jenkins, green climate fund, intergovernmental panel on climate change, unfcclast_img read more

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PEMCo to perform annual revue ‘Raise a Little Hell’

first_imgThis weekend, the Pasquerilla East Musical Company (PEMCo) will be hosting its annual revue. The theme of this year’s revue, directed by sophomore Mary Hope Clark, is “Raise a Little Hell.”“I like to describe it as songs of villainy, sin, revolution and chaos,” Clark said. “A lot of people in musical theater will always be like, ‘Oh the villain has the best songs,’ so I thought, ‘Alright, let’s put them together. Let’s make it fun.’” Photo courtesy of Clare Strickland Members of the Pasquerilla East Musical Company prepare for the debut of their upcoming revue, “Raise a Little Hell.” The show will feature songs from a variety of musicals, including “Wicked,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Hamilton” and ”Chicago.”Clark said the show features 20 cast members and 22 songs that come from musicals such as “Les Miserables,” “Wicked,” “In the Heights,” “Beauty and the Beast” and “Chicago.”“That’s what so great about a revue is that we can do songs from shows that we normally wouldn’t be able to put on, like shows like ‘Wicked’ and ‘Hamilton’ that are still performing,” PEMCo executive producer and junior Clare Strickland said.Clark said she was selected as the revue’s director two weeks before spring break, and auditions were held the following weekend.“When you apply to be a director, you apply with ideas for different themes you’d like to do,” she said. “I went a little hard. I sent in six single-spaced pages and 3,000 words about why I wanted to do this revue. I basically outlined I think everything I wanted to do.”Strickland said the theme idea is one of the reasons Clark was chosen as director.“We don’t necessarily pick the theme based off the director, but Mary Hope had a very clear vision and that’s one of the things we loved about her as a director choice,” she said.Clark said she had a rough list of songs before the auditions, but she also selected songs that cast members used in their auditions.“When people audition, they bring in songs that they think would fit the theme,” she said. “ … It’s a working process, and I think that really makes it special because it’s a lot of input into the theme and choosing what stories we want to tell.”Clark has chosen to donate all the proceeds from the show to the Felician Franciscan Sisters Haiti Mission. She said she chose the charity because of a nun she met from her home diocese.“She’s the most rocking nun I’ve ever met in my life,” she said. “She goes with a guitar everywhere. After the earthquake in Haiti, she went down with a couple other nuns from her order, and they’ve just been down there every since just doing wonderful work. Everywhere they go, they’re always doing great work, but they’re spreading music with that. They’re giving shelter, they’re giving aid, but they’re also bringing joy and God’s word through music.”Besides the charitable component, Strickland said people should come to the show because it will be a fun experience.“The core of it is it enjoyable to watch,” she said. “ … It’s really a full-on performance, and you’re watching these actors who are enjoying it just as much as you will be. It’s for a great cause, but it’s a very well-done show.”Clark said she is most looking forward to seeing the audience’s reaction to the show.“It’s not your typical love song, happy musical ballad,” she said. “We’re showing more of the darker side of Broadway and really embracing that because it is this wonderful, wonderful side that doesn’t always get highlighted because there’s just so many good things about musicals that sometimes a lot of the good things can be overshadowed by others. I really want to let the villainy shine a little bit.”Performances will be in Washington Hall Lab Theater Thursday and Friday nights at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 4:30 p.m.Tags: ‘Raise a Little Hell’, PEMCo, PEMCo Revue, revue, Washington Halllast_img read more

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2019 Student Government Insider

first_imgTags: 2019 Student Government Election Dom DeMoe and Ann Curtis | The Observer Editorial: The Observer endorses Boyle-McGuireStudent government candidates discuss platforms in election debateBoyle-McGuire ticket overviewMarkho-Ortega ticket overviewLuna-Coleman ticket overviewChang-O’Leary ticket overviewlast_img

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