Campbellville man arrested for illegal gun, ammo

first_imgRanks of the Guyana Police Force have arrested a man in Campbellville, Georgetown, who was found in possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition.According to Police reports, sometime around 12:00h on Tuesday, ranks were on patrol duty in the Campbellville area when they stopped and searched the man on Duncan Street.During the search, the officers discovered a .32 pistol along with four matching rounds.The suspect was taken into custody and is assisting with the investigation.This comes just one day after an Essequibo man was arrested and charged with possession of a firearm and ammunition without being the holder of a valid licence.According to reports, Paul Primo, of Farm Village, East Bank Essequibo, was arrested on Monday at Arakaka, North West District.He pleaded guilty when he appeared at the Mathews Ridge Magistrate’s Court the same day and was sentenced to three years imprisonment.last_img read more

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Boakai Wants TRC Recommendations Implemented

first_imgVice President Joseph N. Boakai says the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) recommendations need to be implemented in order to resolve problems facing the country.The Commission came into being as a result of the Comprehensive Accra Peace Accor (CPA) that put an end to the 14 years civil conflict in Liberia.In 2010, the TRC concluded its operations and made several recommendations to the national government. Some of the recommendations included, “banning the few Liberians responsible for insecurity in the country for 30 years from holding public office, establishing an Independent National Human Rights Commission and conducting palava hut discussions across the country to resolve political, social and ethnic differences.”In an exclusive interview with Daily Observer recently in Monrovia, the Vice President indicated that recommendations from the Commission should be dealt with in order to promote stability.Though he failed to name which among the recommendations should be implemented and how, the Deputy President was quick to mention, “recommendations of the document that would reconcile the country should be implemented.”Political commentators have said that if the recommendation calling for banning Liberians who took part in the destroying of the country should be implemented as stated by the TRC’s Commissioners, than most officials holding top posts, including President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, would be affected.However, the Vice President noted that as Liberia modelled its TRC from the South African government’s version, it is important that portion of the document which speaks of embracing every Liberian and creating an environment to forget the past that divided Liberians must be of significant interest.The Vice President maintained that there are several of the recommendations already being considered for implementation by government.“The problem here is that, the war in Liberia was such that after a certain amount of time you couldn’t tell who did what and for what reason,” he maintained.Ambassador Boakai used the medium to caution Liberians about the document, stressing; “the TRC’s recommendations are something that we consider carefully.” He wants the report to serve as a primary tool in reconciling Liberians rather than further dividing them.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Several Rural Roads in Deplorable State Nationwide

first_imgWith no substantive utterances from the dormant Public Works Ministry for the past eighteen months, several reports gathered from the rural parts of the country show that most roads are in deplorable conditions.Almost all of the MPW officials have not come forward to throw light on short, medium and long range plans to rehabilitate primary, secondary and feeder roads throughout the country.As a strict policy of the Minister proper of the MPW, Dr. Antoinette Weeks, the Communications and Publication Department, is not clothed with the authority to provide the relevant information regarding the nation’s road network.The many complaints coming from rural Liberia, especially farmers and businesspeople, continue to fall on deaf ears of the MPW officials.But the current Minister of Finance and Development Planning Amara Konneh, did issue one statement, that owing to the Ebola plague, a hold had been placed on all road projects.Principally, even conveyance of critically needed goods, services and medical materials have been an uphill battle due to the deplorable conditions of many roads in rural Liberia.It has been gathered that even the conveyance of critically needed Ebola virus and other vital medical supplies to rural health facilities has been a complete nightmare in most parts of the country.The road networks in the capital, Monrovia, have not been spared. Many are in very deplorable conditions that continue to pose serious threats to commuters and commercial and private vehicles.Many of the main avenues in the Sinkor and other parts continue to depreciate rapidly to the detriment of the hundreds of commercial and private cars.Primary, private and commercial car owners have added their voices to the unpleasant sentiments about the road conditions.Recently, a Western diplomat remarked that Monrovia’s avenue and other neighborhood roads needed short, medium and long-term rehabilitation and reconstruction in order to ensure some smooth movement of goods and services.“It would actually be an honorable gesture if the Liberian Government could place on its national agenda to prioritize the rehabilitation and reconstruction of avenue and neighborhood roads in Monrovia,” the diplomat stressed.In exclusive interviews, some Monrovia residents and businesspeople called on the Public Works Ministry to wake up and pay attention to the rehabilitation and reconstruction of Monrovia’s avenues and neighborhood roads.Resident Robert B. Thomas, 40, of Cheeseman Avenue told the Daily Observer Monday that the Liberian Government should in the upcoming Dry Season rehabilitate some of Monrovia’s streets and avenues.“My brother, even most of our drainages are in very deplorable conditions and need urgent rehabilitation and reconstruction by the Ministry of Public Works during this Dry Season in our city,” Mr. Thomas asserted.Businessman Lawrence M. Jallah, 48, importer of computer accessories, called on the MPW executives to critically consider the rehabilitation and reconstruction of Monrovia’s deplorable avenues and neighborhood roads.“I think the MPW leaders should do away with the extensive planning and embark on concrete projects that Liberians and their development partners can see and appreciate,” Mr. Jallah emphasized.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Powering Science and Technology for Africa’s Economic Transformation

first_imgAfrica has achieved exceptional economic growth over the past decade, averaging 4.5 percent a year and underpinned by prudent macroeconomic management.  Now we must achieve economic growth that is accompanied by significantly less poverty and greater prosperity for all the people of the continent.With new discoveries of oil, gas, and minerals seemingly every month, we need to be able to extract, market, and invest the new-found earnings from these resources in higher quality education, health, and other vital development priorities.As Africans move to cities in ever-growing strength, we must also address unprecedented rates of urbanization and new needs for housing, infrastructure, and agricultural productivity to feed urban residents as well as increase food security in rural areas.  On the environment front, Africa, which has contributed the least to climate change, is bearing its disproportionate impact in terms of droughts, floods, rising sea levels which in turn bring economic losses and hardship.  At the same time, these challenges also bring opportunities for joint research that would benefit scientists across the world as well in Africa. There is scope for similar research collaboration between African and foreign scientists in medicine and biodiversity, irrigation, engineering, mining and other fields.But here is the challenge. We will only achieve these exciting research coalitions in Africa if we correct a longstanding imbalance in our education systems.  Today, our stock of graduates is still highly skewed towards the humanities and social sciences, while the share of our students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) averages less than 25 percent. Further, women are under-represented in science and technology-related courses and professions on the continent.Thanks to Africa’s recent progress in school enrolment, more and more students are completing primary and secondary school. This new generation of young Africans must be equipped with the modern skills and knowledge they need to find African solutions to Africa’s challenges. Earlier this year, at a High-Level Forum on Higher Education for Science, Technology and Innovation hosted by the Government of Rwanda and the World Bank in Kigali, participating countries and partners called for a bold target—to double the share of African university graduates in science and technology fields within a decade, by 2025. This is key to transform Africa into a knowledge-driven continent within a generation.So how can we do it? There are proven steps that can be taken to realign higher education with the needs of the 21st century economy and to brighten the career prospects of young Africans today. Partnership is the operative word, between academic institutions both in Africa and abroad, between universities and the private sector, and with new investment partners in Asia and Latin America. Systemic reforms are also necessary, particularly to improve the quality of education across all levels of the education system, and to make higher education more relevant to the needs of would-be employers.African universities have much to gain from joining forces with universities abroad, such as through the University of Michigan’s STEM-Africa initiative which has nurtured young scientists and advanced research networks with institutions in Africa, and also their work in training mathematicians and doctors on the continent.In fact, the African Diaspora can play a very critical role in advancing science and technology in their countries of origin by helping generate new interest in supporting the STEM fields in Africa.  We must mobilize a wide alliance of supporters including policymakers, international financial institutions such as the World Bank Group, and academics, both in Africa and abroad.  At the same time, universities in Africa now need to achieve the next level of home-grown excellence.A number of US and European universities have campuses and programs overseas, notably in Asia and the Middle East—and the next frontier is Africa. One US university has opened a campus in Rwanda, and the first cohort of students from this centre will graduate later this year. By building campuses in Africa, such programs bring quality education that is adapted to local cultural norms and requirements. Universities that move quickly will be at a significant advantage as this is a growing market that will only become larger as Africa continues its robust economic growth.  Students must also be able to apply what they learn once they graduate and look to cross the threshold of the jobs market. This requires innovative partnerships and coalitions, as well as targeted reforms.  Following the example of countries like Kenya and Senegal, ministries responsible for higher education should aim to boost private representation on their university boards and engage with the private sector to strengthen links with employers, including on curriculum design. Private sector partners in Africa can also offer apprenticeships, internships, and certification programs, to help bridge the gap between what is being taught in universities and the realities of the job market, and to invest in the next generation of technicians and corporate recruits.The World Bank is working with eight African governments and the Association of African Universities on the Africa Centres of Excellence initiative, which will strengthen 19 centres of excellence in West and Central Africa. This initiative aims to build and sustain excellence in higher education in Africa, particularly in science and technology, by fostering regional specialization, concentrating limited top-level faculty and generating knowledge “spillovers.” This sort of cooperative action is vital to maximize the impact of limited resources and achieve greater regional integration.Africa’s new partners—countries such as Brazil, China, India and Korea—can play an important role in building human capital in Africa. These countries have rich experience in developing higher education programs that serve the needs of modernizing economies, and have much to offer by way of lessons learned and active partnerships. The World Bank is working towards building a Partnership for Skills in the Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (“PASET”) that brings together new partners and African policymakers, to catalyse this process especially in high-potential sectors.  Partnership among all of these networks will commit us all to a coordinated, faster approach to advancing science and technology in Africa and helping Africans young people achieve their aspirations. It will also help companies to find young Africans with advanced skills and knowledge locally, allowing them to compete and thrive in international markets.  As more than 11 million young Africans try to join enter the job market every year over the next decade, we need to make strategic investments in their education and other development prospects in order to drive and sustain Africa’s economic transformation.Makhtar Diop, the World Bank’s Vice President for Africa, is in Rwanda attending the AfDB Annual  Meetings.   Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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French Ambassador Assures Country’s Commitment to Ebola Fight

first_imgThe French Ambassador to Liberia, Joël GODEAU, has given assurance that France remains committed to Liberia’s post-war development and the fight against Ebola.Ambassador GODEAU expressed the commitment yesterday when he turned over of a vehicle and US$80,000 to the Liberia National Red Cross (LNRC).Speaking at his residence where the presentations were made,  Ambassador GODEAU declared that, “The French will not remain insensitive or indifferent to the fate of Liberia and its people.”He said the donation, given mainly by French companies  in Liberia, was a demonstration of France’s response to President Sirleaf’s call to contribute to the reconstruction and development of the country. France will not abandon Liberia in this current trouble.“The contribution of French businessmen is part of the very strong commitment of France, alongside the communities hit by the Ebola virus in your country, Liberia, as in neighboring countries including Guinea and Sierra Leone,” Ambassador GODEAU added.Recounting other activities of France to the Ebola crisis, the Ambassador noted that from the beginning of the tragedy France immediately mobilized itself and established research institutes which first identified the epidemic. The work of these institutes is being used in diagnosing and monitoring the disease, and researching drugs and vaccines against the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD).Although the biggest portion of France’s contribution to the Ebola fight goes to its former colony Guinea, Ambassador GODEAU noted that institutes and testing centers in Guinea have immensely helped Liberians who have contracted the disease in that country.He also indicated that France has mobilized a bilateral aid of 35 million Euros and another multilateral extra aid of over 35 million Euros via the World Bank, the African Development, amongst others.The donation on September 25, 2014 was a joint effort by French businesses operating in Liberia under the umbrella  of the French Business Club.Companies or business entities that contributed include UMARCO-Bolloré, CICA Motors, Renault Garage, DELMAS-Liberia Inc., Liberia Equipment Ltd., TOTAL-Liberia, Bureau Veritas, Salala Rubber Corporation, AGS Frasers and BIVAC International.The head of the group, Jean-Michel MACIA, who also owns UMARCO, said despite the difficulties associated with commerce in the country now as a result of the epidemic, French businesses were still here to help make the economy stable to avoid more suffering for the Liberian people.He praised the Liberia National Red Cross for what he described as “tremendous” work done and still continues to do, stressing that they were here to complement the institution’s effort to fight the Ebola virus by donating US$80,000 and a vehicle.Vice President Joseph Boakai, in his statement acknowledging the French donation, noted that France is very committed to partners with whom it usually makes impacts.VP Boakai began by extending condolence to the French Government for the killing of one of its citizens in Algeria by terrorists.He commended the French companies for their donations and said Liberia will not be defined by the virus. Ebola will become history, he declared.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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What President Sirleaf May Tell the Legislature Today

first_imgThe President’s Annual Report on the State of the Nation will most likely be dominated by the GOL’s battle against the deadly Ebola virus disease that rocked the country in 2014.  She will tell the Representatives and Senators  assembled of the fierce battle against the virus which she and her team, led by the Ministry of Health, the Incident Management System,  thousands of Liberian health  workers, the Liberian people  and our international partners  have bravely fought.  Today, with confirmed cases definitely below 10 throughout the country, this battle is almost won.  By God’s grace, Liberia is poised to be declared Ebola-free!Ellen is expected to receive an outburst of applause, probably a standing ovation, for bravely and brilliantly leading this battle as Commander-in-Chief and winning it.  Our patriotic brother, Representative Saah Joseph, even crossed the border into neighboring Sierra Leone with ambulances and supplies to continue the fight there, too.Next, President Sirleaf will most likely lay out to the nation and the world, especially our international partners, her post-Ebola AGENDA.  She will start by recapping all the support we have received from our international partners and all their pledges in the post-Ebola period.She will begin with the offer by the Chinese government,  delivered through its Ambassador Zhang Yue, to help Liberia develop its post-Ebola healthcare and medical system.She restate the United States’ pledge to do all it can to help rebuild Liberia’s healthcare delivery system.The next most important thing the President may attempt is to lay out before the Legislators is her roadmap, to be embarked upon immediately, on how this is to be accomplished—what Liberia’s post-Ebola healthcare delivery system should look two years from now.  She will seek to establish health centers and hospitals in the remotest parts of Liberia, especially places in the southeast such as Grand Gedeh, River Gee, Grand Kru and River Cess counties that have not seen a modern hospital in generations.  She will tell the Legislators how she intends to intensify the training, in great numbers, of our health, medical and paramedical personnel as well as medical specialists of every kind, some of whom the John F. Kennedy Medical Center once boasted but not since the 1980 coup d’etat; and some of whom we have never had.The President will outline a sustainable plan for how these healthcare delivery workers will be paid, and how they will be encouraged to be willing to serve in remote parts of the country.Closely tied to this grand plan to fix Liberia’s healthcare and medical system is the nation’s   Education system which is in shambles and needs a dramatic turnaround—but how? Is the big question which she will have to answer in her Message.  The system is broken at all levels, from nursery through through tertiary, where even the state-run University of Liberia, after successive entrance examinations, administered to thousands of applicants, still can hardly find 300 really qualified ones to enter.This educational crisis also affects the vocational and technical institutions, some of which have been badly run and attempts to fix the system has met with stiff resistance by former and current employees.The President has recently spoken of grave concern with the thousands of young people on the streets and how she can bring them into the education system to assure them a brighter future.  Most likely she will state how she intends to address this serious challenge, where over 65% of the population is under 25.The Legislators themselves know of the many efforts the President has made in rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure—energy, roads, water, etc., and how much of this has been interrupted by Ebola that drove many expatriate personnel manning these projects out of the country.  With Ebola almost gone, these expatriates are  slowly returning to resume their work.There are two other critical areas that the President would need to tackle in her Message—how to fix Agriculture and assure the nation its food security; and how to empower Liberians in business.  This latter one is critical, for that is the only way Liberians will defeat poverty.  Keep foreigners dominating the Liberian economy and keep Liberians in perpetual poverty.The President has a tall but challenging order of business today.  We wish her well!  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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EX-LNOC Treasurer, Volleyball Prexy Dies

first_imgThe Mulbah and Gbanoe’s families are deeply grieved to announce the passing of Mr. Avenso Z. Mulbah, former president of the Liberia Volley Ball Federation (2000-2009) on March 22, at the Redemption Hospital in Monrovia.He was 59 years old.The deceased was a prominent figure in Liberia Volleyball widely credited for transforming the game in the country.However, owing to poor health, Mr. Mulbah resigned his post as president, after nearly ten years in office.Prior to becoming president of LVF, Mr. Mulbah was a founding member and president of Caldwell based Convex 12.The late Mulbah served as treasurer of the Liberia National Olympic Committee.LNOC President, Philibert Brown termed the former treasurer’s death as a loss not just to the bereaved family, but also to the Olympic Committee. “The late Mulbah was a member of the Olympic family,” Brown said.The LNOC, with the consent of the bereaved family will pay all funeral expenses its president said.The LVF on her part has offered to build the tomb of its former president.The late Mulbah was born on August 11, 1955 in Duogomai Town, Lofa County unto the union of Oldman Wolobah Gbanoe and his wife Oldma Bowa.He started his primary education in Kolahum District, Lofa County in 1964 and later completed high school at the Voinjama High School in 1975.He earned a BA degree in accounting from the college of Business and Public Administration at the University of Liberia in 1987.The late Mulbah began his professional career on March 3, 1976 as an Account Clerk at the International Trust Company (ITC bank).He joined the National Bank of Liberia, (now Central Bank of Liberia) in 1976 as a junior and intermediate clerk and rose to the position of a senior clerk from1977 till the outbreak of the civil war in 1990.Mr. Mulbah migrated to the Monrovia Banking Corporation (ROVIA) on January 15, 1990 and served as Assistant Manager in the account department.The deceased left the banking sector after fifteen years to work as a Finance Officer for Sustainable Development Promoter (SDP) from 1995 -2000. He was head of finance for NGO, Action for Greater Harvest (2003-2006).In 2007, the career accountant worked as Administrative Officer for the Center for Justice and Peace Studies (CJPS).The deceased leaves to mourn his beloved wife Mrs. Demowah Mulbah, seven children, 12 grand children, 10 sisters, two brothers and several nephews and nieces.His remains will be removed from the AB Anderson Funeral Home on Lynch Street on Friday afternoon, April 3, and taken to the Wholesome World Church in Caldwell for wake keeping.Funeral rites will be held at the same church at 10:00am on Saturday, April 4, and interment will follow immediately at the New Georgia Cemetery in Caldwell. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Chinese Mobile Phone Company Tecno Explains Why It Only Does Business in Africa

first_imgChina-based mobile phone manufacturer, Tecno Telecom Limited, exclusively does business in Africa. Last year, the company released the first ‘made in Ethiopia’ smartphone. Tecno vice president, Arif Chowdhury was in Nairobi recently and told How we made it in Africa’s Dinfin Mulupi about the firm’s expansion strategy and its plans to move all of its manufacturing to Africa.How and why did Tecno enter the African market?The company started in 2006 in Hong Kong with our first research and development centre in Shanghai, China. For two years, our business focused on the South Asia market. After studying the markets in South East Asia, Africa and Latin America, we found out that Africa would be the most lucrative market for us. We began operations here in 2008 before eventually stopping our business in Asia to exclusively focus on Africa.Today, Tecno does business in Africa only. We want to be the mobile king of Africa. The continent receives a lot of imports but the products are not always modelled to fit demand here. We ensure our products meet the local demand because they are solely produced for the African market. We are present in 12 countries in East, West and Central Africa where we currently control an average of 20% market share in each of the countries. This year we are going to explore the Southern and Northern Africa markets starting with South Africa and Egypt. We are also going to strengthen relations with technology giants both in manufacturing and service provision to ensure quality in products and customer experience. We have no option but to have the best products. You can’t be a failure in Africa and go somewhere else. We have to make it here.The African mobile market is dominated by global giants. How do you intend to become king?Even Tecno is a giant. We fight with them with more localisation and customisation of devices. We are very focused on each of the countries we do business in and their demands. With the right product and communication you can compete with them. The competition is good because it forces all players to bring better devices, better features and better prices. This is the 21st century, anybody and everybody has a chance to make it. Creativity and innovation are, however, important. It is also important to know that just because a firm is successful in Europe does not mean they are guaranteed success in every other market. The question is: what value are they adding to this particular market?Explain some of the trends you are seeing in Africa’s mobile marketThe smartphone is the mobile device to watch this year. The prices are coming down and the sales volumes will increase. This is driving mobile internet access, which then opens up a lot of doors for innovation in that space. Studies indicate that most people now access the internet through their mobile phones as opposed to PCs. We are launching more internet series mobile phones to serve the growing demand. Our research from years back shows that the buyers of Tecno phones are mostly the youth and we have decided to [focus] on this market of people aged 17 to 35. The young people want to be unique. They want unique features that allow them to play and chat.Tecno released the first ‘made in Ethiopia’ smartphone last year. Are there any plans to roll out plants in other African countries?We are proud to say that some of the Tecno phones are already ‘made in Africa’. We started a plant in Addis Ababa two year ago and it is doing well so far. We chose Ethiopia because it is unique, looking at it from a strategic point of view. We found Ethiopia’s duty structure to be more attractive. We eventually plan to move our entire production to Africa since this is the only market we serve. We will start with establishing manufacturing plants in Kenya and Nigeria. This will depend highly on a lot of factors like the customs structure and government support we receive.Some African countries are now past 100% mobile penetration. Are you expecting the mobile devices market to start shrinking?For the next five to 10 years, we expect Africa to remain the fastest growing market in the world. For the countries that are past 100% penetration, there is still a market for phone replacement. Most countries are, however, still behind in terms of penetration and we therefore expect new subscribers there. We are confident that the market is still huge, and it will be so for the next couple of years.What challenges do you face?This is the fastest moving industry. A day in the mobile industry is like a week or month in other industries. We have to constantly launch new products and improve quality and service. The competition here is fierce. The counterfeit phones are also a challenge.Describe the experience you have had while doing business in Africa.People who have not visited Africa have the wrong perception of the continent. The challenges are not as bad as the media makes it appear. If you are sincere with the people, they will support you. No other part in the world has as much resources as Africa.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Senate C’ttee Recommends Tolbert Nyenswah Confirmation

first_imgThe Senate Committee on Gender, Health, Women, Social Welfare and Children Protection, has recommended the unanimous confirmation of Deputy Minister of Health-designate for disease, surveillance and epidemic control, Tolbert D. Nyenswah.According to the recommendation contained in the committee’s confirmation hearing report read before plenary yesterday, Mr. Nyenswah was found to possess the requisite educational background and work experience to effectively discharge the duties and functions of Deputy Minister of Health.Following a thorough examination of the statement made by the nominee and his record of service with the Ministry of Health for 17 years, the committee chaired by Senator (Dr.) Peter S. Coleman said it was convinced of Nyenswah’s passion, determination, caring leadership and managerial skills and a commitment to excellence.The recommendation states that “The Committee also observed that he is a highly effective and an excellent strategic planner and program implementer as exemplified during the Ebola crisis, with the ability to find solutions to challenging problems. His vision (regarding) disease surveillance and epidemic control will positively and effectively impact the Ministry of Health in building a resilient health care system in Liberia,” said the report.“The committee is convinced that the nominee has the requisite educational background and work experience to effectively discharge the duties and functions of Deputy Minister for Disease, Surveillance and Epidemic Control, and in view of the foregoing, the committee is pleased without any reservation to recommend to the plenary of the Liberian Senate to unanimously confirm the nominee for the post he was nominated to occupy.”The confirmation hearing done on June 24 was signed by Senators Jim Tornolah, Daniel F. Naatehn, J. Bleh-bo Brown, members, and Peter S. Coleman, Chairman.President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf recently nominated Nyenswah to a position that does not exist at the Ministry of Health which raised eyebrows among lawmakers, including Senator Coleman who argued that if one should be created, an amendment to the Act creating the Ministry of Health was needed.The lawmakers contended that the creation of such a position needed to be legislated, and that until the President proposed an amendment to that law, Mr. Nyenswah was not considered a candidate for confirmation hearing.But in her letter of nomination to the Senate, President Sirleaf countered that her action was in keeping with an Act to amend the New Executive Law, which provides for the appointment of more than one deputy minister within a ministry as was approved on May 16, 1974.It can be recalled that during his appearance before the Senate plenary a few days ago, Mr. Nyenswah, who heads the Incident Management System (IMS) for the fight against the Ebola Virus, warned that while Liberia had seen zero cases of Ebola for quite some time, there was a possibility of re-introduction of the disease in the country.He however asserted that so long as there was appropriate recognition, triage, isolation and treatment of re-introduced cases, “we can prevent the spread of infection in our country.”He cautioned that closure of the borders with neighboring Guinea and Sierra Leone is only a cosmetic fix to solving the problem.The fear created by the warning had hardly subsided when Mr. Nyenswah announced the most dreaded news Monday evening that there was a very likely confirmed case of the deadly Ebola virus disease in Liberia, contracted by a 17-year-old boy who died last Saturday.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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THE RESOLVE TO BE AND DO BETTER (PART THREE): THE POWER OF DETERMINATION

first_imgIn this third article of the series centered on how to improve self and help others do the same, the thrust is on the potency of determination. One of the key requirements for making meaningful progress and accelerating it is determination. What then is determination and how does it contribute to improvement of self and others? How may one recognize, cultivate and maintain the inner quality of perseverance and tenacity? Let examine in brief below. The second article on the necessity of having meaning and purpose in life made the following major points:Meaning and purpose becomes a key impetus for self-improvement and for achieving a lot of good things in life. Many people do badly or poorly because they have no reason or purpose to live for and to achieve anything for. They go through life purposelessly and aimlessly. Meaning and purpose differs from person to person, culture to culture and generation to generation. But Christianity and the world religions believe that there is an overall purpose and meaning for all humans regardless of age, culture, and status. What is it then?The catechisms (basic doctrinal teachings of a denomination) of some mainline denominations of the Christian faith put it succinctly and beautifully like this: “The purpose of man is to know, love, glorify and enjoy God forever”. Man was created in God’s image for love and fellowship. King Solomon, the wisest and richest King whoever lived, penned down these words: “Vanity of vanities! All is vanity. Fear God, and keep his commandments; for this is the whole duty of everyone” (Ecclesiastes 1:2; 12:13).The fear of God and keeping his commandments are fulfilled in having and maintaining good relationships with God, fellow human beings and the environment. God’s will is justice, fairness, peace and wellbeing for all. We worship and glorify God by doing what is right and helpful to all. Every person then finds his/her own purpose in life (divine purpose or calling) in whatever area of life that excites, generates passion and drive in him/her and is in the areas of human endeavors that up lift all humanity. This covers every honorable profession and field of human endeavor. It can take the forms of teaching, serving, entrepreneurship, politics, law, sports, business, pastoring, administration, hospitality, envisioning and the like. Every person, then, ought to find out his/her unique purpose in life and seeks ways to improve and use self for God’s glory, his/her own good and the good of others. Meaning and purpose then produces passion and drive which in turn produces determination which withstand and overcome opposition and numerous obstacles which often come in the way of progress and moving to the next level. Determination may be defined as a quality of mind that settles for something and will not let it go lightly; a strong will power that defines character; the art of being resolute in pursuing a definite goal. Other words that can be synonymous with determination are importunity, perseverance, tenacity, persistence and resoluteness. Many times in life what differentiates between a successful person and the one who falls by the wayside or falls short of full potential is determination. The same temptations, challenges, problems and unbearable pain that cause many to give up can be overcome and turned into assets by the determined person. A lot of drive and passion keep the determined individual going while the intelligent, better educated and well-resourced falter and be left stagnant and behind forever.Helen Keller is a perennial example of sheer determination. She lived in the late 1880’s and early 1900’s. Made blind and deaf by a debilitating disease at the age of nine, she rose above the challenges in those days of being blind and deaf to acquiring a university degree and becoming an author, a lecturer, and an activist for the disabled. She could have mourned and blamed other people for her condition. No, rather she worked extra hard and excelled above many normal persons!Another shining example of the power of determination is that of Nelson Mandela who stayed in jail for twenty-seven years in a cause he knew to be right and for the sake of resisting evil and thereby inspiring many to carry on the struggles from where he left off. Determination and perseverance can break the power of the heartlessness of tyrants, corrupt and powerful holders of wealth, privileges and authority and give victory to the poor and powerless who carry in the face of what may appear insurmountable. Anyone who wants to move ahead in life in a positive direction and inspire others to do the same must have and keep the potent weapon of determination.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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