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Vaccines have no link to autism study of 657000 children finds

first_img Sci-Tech The Art of Science draws beauty from medical research Related stories In conclusion, the Danish team ended with a resolute statement in support of the idea that “MMR vaccination does not increase the risk for autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children, and is not associated with clustering of autism cases after vaccination.” The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on March 5, was funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation and the Danish Ministry of Health. In recent years, the anti-vax movement has gathered steam, resulting in a reluctance among some parents to get their children vaccinated. This social shift recently caused the World Health Organization to label “vaccine hesitancy” one of the biggest threats to global health in 2019. Measles cases continue to rise, with the WHO stating that the global spike is the result of “gaps in vaccination coverage.”In 2018, there was an almost 50 percent increase in worldwide measles cases and approximately 136,000 deaths. And the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have already reported 206 cases of measles in just two months, after a total of 372 cases were reported in 2018. Will this new, comprehensive data set be enough to sway those on the anti-vaccine side? Probably not. A number of studies over the last decade have looked at various vaccines, including those that contain mercury-based thimerosal, and found no association between autism and vaccines — a handful of research papers suggest otherwise, but the idea largely survives thanks to a fraudulent paper from 1998, the wilds of social media and a pervasive sense of mistrust. 13 Photos It only hurts for a second. Karl Tapales/Getty Images The vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella doesn’t cause autism, according to a massive, new study.  It’s yet another study that unravels any tie between vaccines and the developmental disability. A link between autism and the MMR vaccine has long been erroneously suggested, due to a controversial paper published in prestigious journal The Lancet over 20 years ago. Read more: How to track the 2019 measles outbreakAlthough the author of that paper, Andrew Wakefield, has been discredited and the original paper retracted, the myth that vaccines cause autism persists, even though mounting scientific evidence suggests otherwise. Today, if you wander too deep into the forest of social media, you’ll eventually be lost in arguments and counterarguments from a vocal minority arguing that vaccines are responsible for the disease.  Not so, shows the new study, conducted by a team of researchers with the Statens Serum Institut in Denmark. Their study followed childbirths in Denmark from 1999 to Dec. 31, 2010, and then followed up with the children from 1 year old until the study was completed in 2013. Using the Danish health registry allowed the researchers to compare a cohort of vaccinated children against unvaccinated children, definitively showing that those who received the MMR vaccine weren’t at a higher risk of autism. Examining 5,025,754 person-years of follow-up data, the researchers found 6,517 children who were diagnosed with autism. The team also showed that even those children considered more susceptible to the condition due to family history and other risk factors were not at higher risk of the disease. Share your voice 20 Tags Comments CRISPR gene editing explained: What is it and how does it work? Scientists use AI to reconstruct brain activity into speech Scientists grow human eye parts to determine how we see in colorlast_img read more

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Fashion Etailer Jabong Sees Fivefold Increase in Losses on Deep Discounts

first_imgFashion and lifestyle e-commerce portal Jabong recorded a five-fold increase in losses to ₹160 crore during the calendar year 2014 due to high discounts on its offerings, although its revenue growth went up by 136% to ₹811 crore, according to the annual of Rocket Internet, its major stake holder.Jabong witnessed a loss of ₹32 crore on sales of ₹344 crore in the previous year.However, a positive development in Jabong’s performance last year was the increase in gross merchandise volume (GMV), the total sales of products on its platform, by 158% to ₹1,321 crore, The Economic Times said.A recent study by UBS estimated the online retailers to turn profitable by 2020 as operating costs (as a percentage of GMV) are likely to decline by an estimated 400 basis points.Considering the earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBIDTA), the company had spent about ₹1.55 paise on every one rupee it earned through sales last year. In 2013, it was ₹1.68 paise.Berlin-based internet company Rocket Internet holds 21.4% stake in Jabong, which was launched in 2012. Jabong competes with Myntra in online apparel retailing.Fast-growing domestic online retailers have come under severe criticism from industry watchers for high discounts and skyrocketing valuations.Meteoric growth seen in India’s e-commerce sector in the last five years was largely led by huge discounts offered by the companies to attract customers to online shopping, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) said in report.Nonetheless, by following an aggressive discounting strategy, the players in the online market have witnessed a manifold increase in their customer base.UBS expects the online retailing market to grow 10 times to range between $48 billion to $60 billion by 2020, based on internet penetration, per capita gross domestic product (GDP), and total retail market size in the country.According to management consultancy AT Kearney, lack of broadband and mobile internet access is constraining the growth of Indian e-commerce market.Though online sales in India increased by 27% to $3.8 billion in 2014, the market size is far below that of other emerging markets such as Brazil with a size of $13 billion, the consultancy added.Discounts will come down as growth moderates from current supernormal phase (to attract more consumers) to moderate growth phase (more users buying online for convenience, choice, etc.), UBS told to NDTV Profit.last_img read more

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Sri Lanka to declare emergency from midnight

first_imgA security officer stands in front of St Anthony`s shrine in Colombo, after bomb blasts ripped through churches and luxury hotels on Easter, in Sri Lanka on 22 April 2019. Photo: ReutersSri Lankan president Maithripala Sirisena will declare a nationwide emergency from midnight on Monday following Easter Sunday suicide bomb blasts at churches and luxury hotels that killed 290 people and wounded more than 500, his office said.“The government has decided to gazette the clauses related to prevention of terrorism to emergency regulation and gazette it by midnight,” the president’s media unit said in a statement.It said the measure would be confined to dealing with terrorism and would not impinge on freedom of expression.last_img
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7 Storytelling Structures to Improve Your Presentations Infographic

first_img Giving presentations, whether during meetings with co-workers or to potential new clients, can often seem intimidating. But luckily, there are tried and true ways to organize your information so that it is both easy to present and clear to your audience.Related: 6 Ways to Take Your Presentation to the Next LevelIn his book, The Seven Basic Plots: Why We Tell Stories, Christopher Booker explains how and why all stories boil down to one of seven plot structures, and how these can act as outlines for effectively presenting all sorts of information. By organizing presentations to follow these story structures, your audience will recognize the familiar flow, and find it easy to understand you and your content.From overcoming a monster to rags to riches, check out this QuidCorner infographic to see how these familiar storylines can help your next PowerPoint leave a lasting impression. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global December 17, 2017 1 min readcenter_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

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