first_imgThese days cloud technology is on everyone’s mind.  Which type is best for their situation; public, private, hybrid, native? What should go in them and how to get there?  However it is just as important to know why you want to move to the cloud.The move to cloud computing is usually driven by one or more of these factors: Replacing aging infrastructure that has reliability problems and high maintenance costs Simplifying overall infrastructure complexity and adopting greater virtualization Supporting needs of business to reduce time-to-market and increase innovation. Deploying additional capacity to support business growth, launch new services/products, and/or streamline expansion into new geographiesFaced with these needs, IT professionals have three major paths to cloud adoption: “do it yourself” by buying and assembling hardware and software components, public cloud services, and converged infrastructure with pre-assembled storage, compute, network, and virtualization.A new 2016 study conducted by Forrester Consulting provides guidance on how customers can evaluate converged or hyper-converged infrastructure. (The study*was commissioned by VCE, the Converged Platforms Division of EMC. ) Time constrained IT leaders who want a practical versus an exhaustive way to evaluate the benefits of converged infrastructure will appreciate the actionable suggestions in this study.As the study describes, Forrester interviewed organizations that implemented VCE converged platform solutions and found that they experienced these quantifiable benefits:Increased Application DevelopmentInfrastructure Cost AvoidanceIT Operational Efficiency IncreaseBusiness Productivity IncreaseSecurity and Compliance Cost ReductionIn a 2015 study**, Forrester wrote: “The fastest path to cloud for most organizations is a fully integrated solution from one of the vendors offering converged private cloud solutions. This approach fast-tracks your ‘journey-to-cloud’ from a technology standpoint and lets you focus on the organizational and process transformations required to support a true and efficient private cloud.”With a broad portfolio of converged and hyper-converged infrastructure platforms – VCE Vblock, VxBlock and VxRack Systems, and VxRail Appliances – EMC enables customers to optimize private cloud capabilities to achieve better business outcomes.The guidance in this new study from Forrester Consulting can help you embark on modernizing your data center with private cloud infrastructure.*Source: A Forrester Total Economic Impact™ Report Commissioned By VCE, “A Practical Guide for Evaluating the Value of VCE Converged Infrastructure for Data Center Modernization” March 2016** “Vendor Landscape: Converged Infrastructure-Based Private Cloud Solutions,” Forrester Research, Inc., June 10, 2015.last_img read more

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Ready Stack: Flexibly Build Your Own Converged Infrastructure

first_imgSometimes, the turnkey approach is the best and fastest approach to modernization. But sometimes, customers need a custom solution that they can build for themselves, or with the support of trusted partners.That’s why we’ve created Ready Stack – a portfolio of validated designs that enable customers to build their own converged infrastructure data center solutions. It’s great news for them – and great news for you, because you can work with them to design and deploy converged infrastructure on a fast and simple sales cycle.Your Solution, all from Dell EMCReady Stack combines component technologies from a single source –Dell EMC, the leader of the overall Converged Systems segment, with more than 2X the revenue share of its nearest competitors1. All-flash storage, next-generation servers, data protection portfolios, and leading open networking solutions come together to help you reduce complexity and risk, and save time and hassle.Ready Stack’s validated designs include:VMware IaaS on PowerEdge MX Servers and PowerMax StorageMicrosoft Hyper-V on PowerEdge 14G Servers and Unity StorageVMware vSphere on PowerEdge 14G Servers and Unity StorageBy sourcing everything from one vendor, customers can greatly reduce the complexity of purchasing, provisioning, and deployment – which means that with Ready Stack, you’ll be offering a highly attractive proposition with fast time to value.Partner benefitsReady Stack industry-leading data center component solutions are designed to make it easier for you to:Increase sales, increase prospects and deepen customer relationshipsAchieve faster time-to-revenueTarget flexible options more accurately to casesReduce riskImprove opportunities to upsell services, which can help increase margins on your deals – including deployment services (with the appropriate accreditation)Showcase your range of competencies, from servers to storage, from core to cloud, and from workstations to IT transformationBenefit from incentive and rebate opportunities as part of our Partner ProgramDell EMC: The leader in Converged InfrastructureTo find out more, visit the Dell EMC Ready Stack Knowledge Center for all the latest Ready Stack resources all in one place, including links to design and deployment guides for each validated design, solution overviews, architecture guides, and more.You can also learn more at the Dell EMC Ready Stack webpage.1 IDC Quarterly Converged Systems Tracker, 2018 Q3last_img read more

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Correction: Taxing Big Tech story

first_imgFRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — In a story January 27, 2021, about global talks on how to tax big technology companies, The Associated Press misspelled the name of the company KPMG on second reference.last_img

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EU: AstraZeneca to supply 9 million more vaccine doses

first_imgBERLIN (AP) — The European Union says vaccine maker AstraZeneca has agreed to supply 9 million additional doses to the 27-nation bloc during the first quarter. The new target of 40 million doses by the end of March is still only half what the company had originally aimed for, triggering a spat between AstraZeneca and the EU last week. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said late Sunday that the British-Swedish pharmaceutical maker will also begin deliveries one week sooner than scheduled and expand its manufacturing capacity in Europe.last_img read more

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Students to rally for peace in Sudan

first_img The rally will include remarks from professional basketball players Ed Bona and Luol Deng, Notre Dame men’s basketball coach Mike Brey, Notre Dame men’s lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan, and a video message from a Notre Dame graduate student from Sudan. Hesburgh visited Sudan more than 15 years ago and remembers driving deep into the country during his trip. Notre Dame students will unite on campus for peace in Sudan on Saturday during a rally that will feature University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh following the Playing for Peace 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The 3-on-3 basketball tournament — sponsored by the men’s basketball team, men’s lacrosse team and student government — will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday in the Joyce Center, and the “Stand with Sudan” peace rally will begin at 12 p.m. in the Joyce Center Fieldhouse. “While student activism is a great part of this, the focus now needs to be on the events unfolding in Sudan and how our voices can contribute to the call for a peaceful and just solution to the problems that may arise with the expiration of the peace accord there,” Corrigan said. “We deeply believe that as the greatest Catholic university in the world we have not only the ability but the responsibility to harness all the means at our disposal, but particularly the Notre Dame athletic brand, for social change,” McCormick said. “We just want to see a sense of urgency. This peace accord is going to expire in January, and we will ask if we let apathy overwhelm us when we have the opportunity to do something,” Dugan said. “All these different groups are coming together for what is unquestionably the most pressing social concerns need of the Church in this year.” On Oct. 5, a delegation from the Sudanese Conference of Catholic bishops visited campus to ask Notre Dame. as a Catholic university. to raise awareness about potential for mass violence in Sudan. “I got a feeling for the place, and it is like most of Africa. Every country in Africa seems to have a problem,” Hesburgh said. “[Sudan’s] problem is are they going to join north or south, or are they going to develop separately … The conflict always boils down to the same thing, and that is access to resources.” “Think of two people in Sudan, the north and the south. Both of those really want peace. Peace is the overarching concern of everybody in Africa today because there has been so much unrest and so much war,” Hesburgh said. “I think it is high time we started working very hard for peace throughout the continent, and I think it is possible.” Shortly after the bishops’ visit, Notre Dame’s Student Senate unanimously passed a resolution pledging support for the people of Sudan. The Student Senate also sponsored an online petition to be sent to President Obama closer to the referendum. “[The bishops’] appeal was to the Catholic community and asked Catholics in the United States to remember the referendum and do whatever we can to call for international attention to Sudan,” McCormick said. “From the student government perspective and from the athletic perspective, we really only think this could have been possible because of the strength of the student body and the level of engagement of our students,” McCormick said.center_img Men’s lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan said he was excited to see the collaboration between the department of athletics and the student body on an issue of international importance. The peace agreement called for six years of democratic reforms and national elections leading up to the referendum. The vote was intended to be a peaceful process, but both sides began to stockpile weapons as the referendum approached. The petition asked policy makers to make preventing violence in Sudan a priority as January draws closer, McCormick said. Director of men’s lacrosse operations Kevin Dugan said the basketball and lacrosse teams got involved because they wanted to do more for campus than ask students to show up at games. “The two most powerful things at Notre Dame, the two things people are most passionate about, are athletics and Catholic social thought,” Dugan said. “When you bring the two of those things together, you can capture the spirit of Notre Dame in a special way.” “What is so exciting about the petition is that it gives students the opportunity to lead, to show that they understand the moral dimensions of this issue and to call the world’s attention to it,” McCormick said. The northern and southern parts of Sudan have been torn by civil war for more than 50 years. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) formally ended civil war in 2005 and scheduled a referendum for Jan. 9, 2011. The Sudanese will then vote on whether Southern Sudan will secede. Social concerns chair Pat McCormick said the rally will combine the visibility of Notre Dame athletics with the University’s moral concern for social justice. The department of athletics harnessed the Notre Dame brand to advertise the event. The Playing for Peace logo, a peace sign embedded in a shamrock, appeared on 2,000 t-shirts to be sold for $5 on Saturday and 2,000 buttons to be distributed for free, Dugan said. Hesburgh said averting this conflict would pave the way for development in Sudan. “Economic development will make good education a top priority, and with good education will come good jobs, and with good jobs will come good salaries,” Hesburgh said. “That is the only way we are going to get equality, by equality of opportunity.”last_img read more

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ND hosts regional debate

first_imgNotre Dame will host the first regional tournament in the Ronald Reagan Great Communicator Debate Series on Saturday. The debate series, sponsored by The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, will feature high school students from across the nation. Students who make the championship tournament will compete at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California, and the winner will receive scholarship awards, according to the foundation website. Dr. Susan Ohmer, academic advisor to the Notre Dame debate team and film, television and theatre (FTT) professor, and Yvonne Waggoner, site coordinator, have been working since May to organize the tournament. “When you put together a tournament, you [have to] think of things like where’s it going to be, how many rooms do we need, all the supplies and equipment,” Ohmer said. Notre Dame was selected to host a regional tournament  because of historic ties between Reagan and Notre Dame, she said. “[The connection] goes back to when President Reagan played the role of the Gipper in “Knute Rockne All-American,” Ohmer said. “And also, [Notre Dame] awarded him an honorary degree. So when [The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation] thought of schools in the Midwest, we came to mind.” This series of debates is based off the format of presidential debates, assuming there is no expertise in debate, Ohmer said. “[The students] don’t have to know special techniques, special terminology; it’s intended to encourage people to speak persuasively and logically on a situation,” she said. Ohmer said to make the debates even more like those during a presidential election, the Reagan Foundation built in specific elements to make the debates more realistic. There will be four preliminary rounds and two elimination rounds throughout the competition and the final debate round will be at 6 p.m. in Washington Hall. Debaters will be scored on their opening statement, rebuttal, response to questions, as well as their closing statement, Ohmer said. “The Reagan Foundation built in some characteristics for it to be more like presidential debates so that in the middle of the debate, the moderator is allowed to ask a question of either side,” Ohmer said. “And that’s straight from the presidential debates.” The most important thing to know about this debate is that you [the students] are asked to present your case to an interested, educated audience, who are not specialists in debate, so it’s called public forum debate.” The judges for the competition are members of the debate team, debate team coaches, students in the Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars Program, as well as students in Ohmer’s class, “Media and the Presidency.” The final debate round in the evening has three judges: Mike Schmuhl, the chief of staff to South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Gary Sieber, who teaches in FTT and works for WNDU television station, and Professor Jay Tidmarsh of the Law School, she said.   Students participating in the event will also be able to get a feel for the campus by eating in South Dining Hall and listening to a presentation from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. “We felt strongly that we wanted the students to be welcomed to campus,” Ohmer said. Contact Catherine Owers at cowers@nd.edulast_img read more

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Mendoza expands program eligibility

first_imgThe applicant pool is open – individuals who attained undergraduate degrees with non-business majors are now invited to apply to the One-Year Masters of Business (MBA) Program within the Mendoza College of Business.  Brian Lohr, director of MBA and Masters of Science and Business (MSB) Admissions, said the changed policy recognizes the achievements of individuals who honed business expertise in the workplace. He said applicants are welcome to apply to the program if they can demonstrate “significant knowledge of fundamental business concepts.”  “The change in requirement takes into consideration more recent trends in the education and employment landscape by recognizing that candidates often have developed considerable knowledge about business through a meaningful work experience after graduation,” Lohr said. “They may have landed in a role that required them to manage budgets, manage projects or supervise others and they gained a lot of on-the-job training in essential business operations.” Lohr said this policy revision was a joint effort between several Mendoza representatives, including both Lohr and Dean Roger Huang. The group changed the policy in order to facilitate the addition of diverse perspectives to the One-Year MBA Program, though the requirements for admission have not changed, Lohr said. “We look for three primary items when we evaluate candidates: academic excellence, leadership and a consideration for others,” Lohr said. “These three components have not changed, this just allows us to look at a little bit of a broader pool.” According to the program’s website, its requirements are, “an undergraduate degree from an accredited university where English is the primary language, a demonstrated proficiency in fundamental business knowledge and skills usually gained through significant work experience, three credit hours of financial accounting and three credit hours of statistics.”  His own experience working in a field he did not study as an undergraduate pushes him to advocate for the extension of eligibility for Mendoza’s programs to prospective students who did not study business during their undergraduate careers, he said. “I am one of those folks,” Lohr said. “I was an English major as an undergraduate but I worked for Lockheed right when I got out of school. About a week after I was hired, I went to my boss and asked him why he hired me, since I didn’t have an engineering or business degree.” He said he felt this experience showed him how when people with distinct backgrounds work collectively to solve a problem, a more innovative solution can be reached.  “I think that’s what makes the classroom environment so different at Notre Dame, those backgrounds allow you to look at problems from different perspectives. I think that is a really good thing that we have going on in Mendoza: about a third of my two-year class is from business, about a third is from math, science or engineering and a third is from humanities. “The diversity makes for interesting discussions and allows students to look back on their experiences to attack a problem from a different angle,” Lohr said. “This [type of education] is unique and fostered here.” Lohr said he expects the extension of eligibility to graduates with non-business majors to increase the quality of Mendoza’s One-Year MBA Program.  “I’m not sure how this will impact the applicant pool, though I feel strongly that it will grow significantly because of that change,” Lohr said. “That just makes sense for Notre Dame, to [work to] attract the best and brightest candidates … to hinder that with stringent prerequisites didn’t make a whole lot of sense. “Our ability to bring in the best and brightest MBA candidates in the world is critical to our continued success.” Lohr said the program has continued to climb Businessweek’s rankings since its inception, and he hopes this change will facilitate the rise of Mendoza’s program. “In 1997 we were not ranked within the top 50 MBA programs and now we’re a part of the top 20 programs based on Businessweek’s last survey,” he said. “We’re excited about what the future holds.” Contact Nicole Michels at nmichels@nd.edulast_img read more

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Alumna named Mitchell Scholar

first_imgOn Nov. 25, The U.S.-Ireland Alliance announced a 2008 Notre Dame alumnus is one of this year’s Mitchell Scholars and will receive a full scholarship to a one-year Master’s program in Ireland.  Molly Hayes, a Kenya desk officer at the U.S. Department of State who graduated from Notre Dame with degrees in English and Arabic, was one of 12 people selected from a pool of 300 applicants.  According to her biography on the Mitchell Scholars website, Hayes has worked as desk officer for multiple North African nations, and she was a deputy coordinator for the Egypt Task Force during the Arab Spring.  During Hayes’s time at Notre Dame, the biography said, she founded ND-Abroad, which worked to help students studying abroad and “developed a University Counseling Center support group for students who experienced trauma abroad.”  Hayes plans to study postcolonial and world literature at National University of Ireland, Maynooth, according to the biography. Dr. Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of National Fellowships at the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said the award, which is on par with the Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships, will bring prestige to the University.  “These are the kinds of things that raise the academic profile of an institution and really enhance Notre Dame’s reputation as a world-class research institution, and really is providing a world-class undergraduate education,” Thibert said. “I think, especially in Molly’s case, it’s a testament to the kind of … education she received here that helped her to achieve such great things in the past four to five years since she left.”  Thibert said the award also raises the profile of CUSE, through which Hayes did research when she was an undergraduate.  “There are a lot of opportunities here, in part through CUSE, but also through other groups on campus to receive funding for undergraduate projects, undergraduate research of all different kinds,” he said. “I’ve been at a few other institutions, and I’m amazed at how much support there is for that here, so I would really encourage people to take advantage of that. “[Doing research through CUSE] contributed, in a sense, to her winning this award, but it also contributed to her being able to get into the kinds of positions she got into with the State Department. And I think that made a really big difference in her application to have these kinds of experiences, which she might not have been able to have if she had not had the opportunities she had here.”  Thibert said while some scholarship applications require University endorsements, the Mitchell Scholars Program does not. He said his office worked with her on other aspects of the application.  “We mostly worked on interviewing advice,” Thibert said. “We have sort of a database of information from past years because we’ve had people interviewing for these things and there’s also a fellowship adviser organization that collects information on these things. We were giving her some advice on what to expect from the semifinalist interview and then from the finalist interview.”  Thibert said he also hopes the fact that Hayes won the scholarship will raise awareness of the opportunities Notre Dame alumni have, even after they graduate.  “We’re trying to do more to reach out to these alumni to get the word out about some of these awards, because sometimes people think when they graduate, that’s kind of it,” he said. “Even if they know they’re eligible for certain things, they don’t realize they can still work with us, but they can. As long as someone graduated from here, we are happy to work with him [or her].”  Contact Emily McConville at emcconv1@nd.edulast_img read more

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SMC seniors reflect on art comprehensive projects

first_imgTags: liz mcbride, senior art comprehensives Saint Mary’s recently exhibited the senior comprehensive projects of senior art majors Emily Engler, Colleen Donohue, Malea Schulte and Elizabeth McBride in Moreau Center for the Arts gallery.The four students’ work was part of the senior exhibitions that occur each spring semester. Student artwork is presented and evaluated by a panel of staff members in the art department, McBride said. Other students have a chance to witness the work as well, both as members of various art classes where they evaluate the work, and by simply walking through the galleries.McBride is a senior art history major, a specified division of the art department. Along with an exhibit showcased in the gallery, art history majors have to write a paper or analysis on a subject. As an artist as well as a musician, McBride said her paper took an interesting turn.“My topic was a visual culture analysis on videosongs,” McBride said. “These are videosongs of artists recording and illustrating their songs. In a way, it’s a subculture and its own genre of music. Since there is a visual element, I was able to analyze is for my art history comprehensive.”For the exhibition part of her comprehensive project, McBride displayed a visual reference of videosong artists executing their work. Even though this was smaller in size compared to other projects, she said that she still took a pride in her work and was proud of how far she had come.“I just sort of put it up without any explanation, but I won’t lie, I stopped and looked almost every time I passed by it. It was for posterity,” McBride said.Though having an exhibit in a gallery and an extensive paper may seem daunting, McBride said she learned many valuable lessons in the process.“My number one piece of advice to any student: work hard,” McBride said. “It isn’t simple, because there is a lot involved. You can work hard to get something done at the last minute, but you’re mostly getting that thing done … because it’s last minute. Working hard is a process that involves consistency and effort.”McBride said for underclassmen, this is a good technique to begin brainstorming ideas for senior comprehensive projects.“[This way,] by the time the capstone or theses projects rolls around, you’ll know essentially what to expect. You can’t avoid or escape the stress, but you’ll know what to expect since you know what you have to do and how to do it,” McBride said.Another rewarding part of these final projects comes in the form of knowing that there are people alongside you for the ride, she said.“I take so much pride in being able to call the other art majors my friends,” McBride said. “We were a support system in every way, and I can’t thank them enough for being there to hear me spiel about videosongs, other stressors and my general random commentaries.“I think that closeness helped each of us create extraordinary work. A good relationship brings the best out of people and that’s exactly what happened. [I have] too much gratitude, and I feel I can’t explain enough in words. Thank you, thank you, thank you.”last_img read more

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