Propane issues were the company’s fault

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion  On Dec. 28, we finally received propane gas. If it wasn’t for a very nice and efficient employee of Ferrellgas out of their Pennsylvania office, we wonder if we would have received our delivery on Dec. 28. When we read the bill the delivery man left, we were charged $100 for “next day delivery.” Dec. 21 to Dec. 28 is next day delivery? We called their Pennsylvania office. We explained our situation to the very nice person. She told us we would have our account credited for the $100. We have been customers of Ferrellgas for approximately 20 years. We have friends who are on automatic fill and called several times for fuel and finally received a delivery when they were just about empty. Ferrellgas was blaming their customers for the problems they had, but it wasn’t the customers’ fault.Rosemary WisniewskiJohn  WisniewskiBroadalbinMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Re Jan. 16 letter, “Propane customers bear responsiblility,” by Kenneth Benson: Unless you’re a propane customer with Ferrellgas, you don’t know what their customers went through during the sub-zero weather in December. This is what we experienced. On Dec. 11, 2017, we called Ferrellgas for a delivery, as we were down 30 percent. We were told we would have delivery by Dec. 18. Dec.18 came and went with no delivery. We called again and were told we would have delivery by Dec. 20. Again, no delivery. We called and were told a delivery would come by Dec. 23. Again, no delivery. We’re on a private road and would have to stand the road before they would come in, even though the road had been plowed. We sanded the road, called and told the person from Ferrellgas at their Johnstown office that the road was sanded and we were expecting more snow by the weekend.last_img read more

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Peterborough offices

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Niche market

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Now LandSecs takes PFI plunge

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Fine risk for housesellers

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LMS suffers second bad year in a row

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New quango in central London

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Talk of the towns

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The hidden consequences of an upward-only ban

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Two train drivers killed in Italy high-speed rail crash

first_imgCardona said none of the injuries suffered were life-threatening and all casualties had been taken to hospital. The Lombardy region’s health department put the number of injured at 31.”It could have been a lot worse,” Cardona said, adding that there were only 33 people on board the train. Only one person was in the first car and two people in the second when the accident occurred, he said.While noting that all possible causes were being investigated, Lodi prosecutor Domenico Chiaro said that “the train derailed near a railroad switch that was supposed to be in a position but was not.”‘Really loud roar’  “I thought I was dead,” a survivor told local newspaper Liberta from hospital in Piacenza where he was being treated for minor injuries. “I closed my eyes and prayed.””The train was going very fast, perhaps 300 kilometres per hour (around 200 miles per hour),” said the unnamed man in his 20s.”Suddenly, I felt a violent blow. A really loud roar,” said the man who was travelling with a friend in the second carriage.”We held hands tightly to avoid falling. The wagon overturned and while waiting for help we went out through a hole to save ourselves,” he said, adding that they were stuck on the crashed train for 15 minutes.Two helicopters, hundreds of firemen, police and other authorities descended on the open farmland area outside of Lodi. Ripped metal The Milan-Salerno train was en route to Bologna when it came off the tracks before dawn. Video images showed ripped metal at the front of the first car, where the engine separated from the train. The first car was flipped on its side and appeared to be still attached to the rest of the train. The engine car could be seen resting on its side on the other side of a nearby railway building several dozen metres away.According to initial findings reported by the media, the engine went off the rails and struck a freight wagon on a parallel track before hitting the building.Italian media reported that work had been done on the track on Wednesday night, but Cardona said it was premature to jump to conclusions on a link between that work and the accident.”Line maintenance is done continually and it’s much too early to associate the accident to maintenance,” he said.Dozens of high-speed trains on the north-south route were cancelled following the derailment, while other trains were rerouted, adding an hour to the journey, operator Trenitalia said.Railworker unions said they would stage a strike throughout Italy on Friday from 1100 GMT to 1300 GMT in protest at the “very serious and unacceptable” accident.Italy’s last serious train accident occurred in January 2018, when three women died and about 100 passengers were injured when a packed train derailed near Milan due to poor track maintenance. Managers and employees of Italy’s state railway, RFI, as well as two former members of the national railway safety agency were charged with negligent homicide and other crimes.Topics : Two rail workers were killed and about 30 people injured on Thursday when a high-speed train derailed before dawn near Milan in northern Italy, authorities said.The crash occurred just after 5:30 am (4:30 GMT) near the town of Lodi, about 50 kilometres (30 miles) south of Milan. “It was a serious accident that had a tragic end with the death of two rail workers” aboard the train, Lodi Prefect Marcello Cardona told reporters, who added that an investigation was underway.last_img read more

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